Walking Pembrokeshire

Walking Pembrokeshire

Exploring Pembrokeshire by foot has to be one of life's great pleasures whether you're an experienced rambler or someone who prefers a more relaxed stroll amid the beauty of the countryside or dramatic vistas of the coast.

Here you'll find a series of walks geared for all levels of fitness that take in the sights and sounds of Pembrokeshire.

Enjoy!

ID: 1789, revised 20/12/2017

St Nicholas

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes at the church car park in St Nicholas is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this short relatively easy walk from the church car park in the picturesque village of St Nicholas to Rhos y Clegyrn moor and back again. 

 

Walking: The walk begins at the church car park in the north Pembrokeshire village of St Nicholas.
Bus: Strumble Shuttle - St Davids to Fishguard.
Train: Nearest station is at Goodwick. Arriva Train Wales 
Road Map: www.multimap.com Search for "St Nicholas, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a free car park at St Nicholas Church, where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are no public toilets nearby. Fishguard, several miles away, has the nearest public toilets.
Refreshments: There are no refreshments available nearby. Please bring your own.

Start / Finish: St Nicholas Church car park.
Distance: 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometres), 1½ hours
Terrain: This is a medium length strenuous walk over quiet country lanes and gravel, earth and grass paths. Very steep in places.
Stiles: 0
Gates: 1
Steps: 0
Bridges: 0
Car Park: 1
Views: several

This short, easy walk begins at the old school car park, behind the lovely church (1), in the picturesque north Pembrokeshire village of St Nicholas and meanders gently along bridleways, country lanes and farm tracks to Rhos y Clegryn moor, suggested site of a Neolithic axe factory, where you will see several prehistoric monuments. This walk can be very muddy and marshy in places so ensure you have the correct footwear!

  • Begin the walk in the car park alongside the old school behind the church. Walk to the lane, turn left, and at the junction, alongside an old petrol pump (2), go straight ahead onto a lovely wooded bridleway.
  • From this path, there are marvellous views to the north and north east of the Pembrokeshire landscape and the brooding Preseli Hills (3).
  • At the end of the bridleway you come to a crossroads, with a number of small standing stones in the hedgerow. Go straight across onto a tree lined farm track that rises fairly steeply.
  • Where the tarmaced path bears right, go straight ahead onto a grassed lane (4), past a small cottage on your left, through a gate, and onto Rhos y Clegryn moor. 
  • The path here can be quite boggy and overgrown but follow the path alongside a wire fence until the moorland opens out and ahead of you is a superb standing stone, 2.7 metres high (5).
  • Nearby are several large circular banks - go to the gate at the far end of the moor to see the largest such bank (6). Richard Fenton, in his A Historic Tour Through Pembrokeshire (1811) describes the site as a large ‘druidical circle' where an axe-hammer has been dug up. Excavations in the 1960s suggest the existence of other stones, possibly including circles, and as Rhos y Clegryn means Moor of the Stones we can be fairly certain this was an important site in prehistoric times. The proximity of several other monuments, including burial mounds and a cromlech, probably confirm this.
  • When you are ready, retrace your steps but when you leave the grassy path and reach the tarmaced lane you might like to take a detour left up to Carn Llys (7) where there are more fine views and ancient sites. Otherwise, head back to St Nicholas.
  • Upon reaching the end of the bridleway by the old petrol pump, turn right and walk through the village and admire some of the fine buildings here. Just before the Old Forge cottage, turn left towards the church.  The church was heavily restored in the 19th century but evidence suggests there was a church or hermit's cell on this site from at least the 5th or 6th centuries AD. The three inscribed stones inside the church attest to such a foundation date.
  • The curious feature known as a ‘squinch' in the south transept is characteristic of many early Pembrokeshire churches. This evidence, combined with the nearby prehistoric monuments, suggests that St Nicholas has been a place of religious and spiritual significance for a very long time. And its not hard to understand why.
  • The landscape around here is beautiful!
  • Behind the church, alongside the old school, is the car park where you began your walk.

 

 

 

 
 

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ID: 235, revised 20/10/2017

Short river walk (Haverfordwest)

It's good to walk, therefore why not step out and sample some of the walks your town has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk is one of a number of town walks which have been produced for you by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this relatively easy walk which provides excellent river views mixed with deciduous woodland all within short walking distance of Haverfordwest Town Centre.

Walking: The Tourist Information Centre is in the town centre.
Bus: Haverfordwest is served by a number of bus services that link it with rest of Pembrokeshire and beyond Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Haverfordwest, it is a short walk from the town centre. Arriva Train Wales 
Road Map: Multimap Search for "Haverfordwest".
Parking: There is a multi storey car park near the Tourist Information Centre
Toilets: Public toilets at the start and finish alongside the Tourist Information Centre and Haverfordwest Bus Station
Refreshments: Haverfordwest has a wide variety of cafes, restaurants and public houses.

Start/Finish: Haverfordwest Tourist Information Centre
Distance: 0.76 miles, 1/2 hour
Terrain: Varying between, Tarmac, Grass one section may be muddy after rain therefore take appropriate footwear
Stiles- No
Gates- 1
Steps- 0
Bridges- 0
Car Park- 1
Views- 0

 

  • Begin this lovely riverside walk at the Haverfordwest Tourist Information Centre (TIC) and walk over the old bridge towards Swan Square.
  • At Swan Square turn right towards the Churnside Roundabout and take the second exit on your right, signposted B4330, using the pedestrian crossing outside the used car centre. Walk north along this road a short distance past the Children's Nursery, until you see the footpath waymarker on your right.
  • Turn onto the grassy path (1) and you will see a wooden gate (2) which marks the beginning of this walk and follow the wide muddy path which leads down a gentle tree-lined slope towards the river. This is easy walking and the path is clearly marked.
  • Soon the path narrows and can become quite overgrown at certain times of the year; where it is slightly boggy, railway sleepers have been laid to make walking easier.
  • The path widens out again (5) and walkers can enjoy the delights of this pleasant walk in deciduous woodland with the Cleddau River on the right, and the remains of the Old Mill watercourse on the left.
  • The path continues winding through the woodland, once again where it is slightly boggy railway sleepers have been laid. The easy part of the path ends here, near the Old Mill Grounds Nature Reserve.
  • Although there is much flora and fauna to be seen, very little remains of the Old Mill itself although there is an interesting ruined bridge over the disused mill watercourse (22).
  • It is possible to continue along this path for a short distance further but it becomes very narrow, winding between fallen trees, and overgrown with the path itself becoming indistinct in places. It eventually peters out where a culvert meets the Cleddau and either the river itself or a field boundary bars any further progress north. 
  • At this point, the walker must turn around and retrace his or her steps to the end of the track and rejoin the B4330 and head towards Churnside Roundabout. Cross the main road at the pedestrian crossing, walk towards Swan Square keeping the used car centre on your left. At Swan Square turn left by the red telephone box onto the old bridge and back to the TIC .

 

 

ID: 236, revised 06/11/2017

Treffgarne Gorge

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your locality has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes at the car park of Salem Chapel, near Spittal Cross, is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this fairly strenuous walk which begins and ends at Salem Chapel car park and takes in a wide variety of scenery on the way - from rolling, open Pembrokeshire landscapes to beautiful enclosed woodland, both deciduous and coniferous in Treffgarne Gorge. 

This two and a half hour walk on the eastern side of the magnificent Treffgarne Gorge encompasses open farmland with spectacular views as well of sections of enchanting woodland, both coniferous and deciduous. 

There are wide varieties of flora and fauna to be seen at all times of the year. The path passes the location of Brunel's intended rail link with Ireland which was abandoned in 1851 on account of the potato famine. 

Near Spittal Cross, just beyond a magnificent railway tunnel, there is a small car park beneath Salem Chapel where the walk begins. 

 

Walking: The walk begins and ends at the small free car park of Salem Chapel, near Spittal Cross.
Bus: 412 (Haverfordwest-Fishguard-Cardigan). Alight at Treffgarne and walk to start point. www.pembrokeshire.gov.uk/bustimetables
Train: Nearest station is at Clarbeston Road. National Rail Enquiries: 08457 484 950 www.nationalrail.co.uk
Road Map: www.multimap.com Search for "Wolfscastle, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a small, free car park below Salem Chapel, near Spittal Cross.
Toilets: None.
Refreshments: None.

Start/Finish: Salem Chapel car park, near Spittal Cross.
Distance: 3.8 miles (6.15 kilometres), 2 ½ hours
Terrain: Strenuous walking on lanes and paths. The latter are grassy, stony and can be muddy and slippery at times. Some very steep sections. Come prepared.
Stiles: 3
Gates: 4
Steps: 18
Bridges: 2
Car Park: 1
Views: several
Car Park: 1

 

  • Turn left onto a tree lined bridleway, bear left where it forks and follow the lane past a stables as it ascends steeply.
  • Near the summit there is a gated, waymarked path on your left.
  • This leads you into beautiful deciduous woodland and later into a coniferous plantation.
  • Take care as the path is narrow and there is a steep slope on your left to the river below. There are the remains of Iron Age earthworks hidden in the trees to your right. 
  • Eventually the path descends very steeply towards the river where you should take the waymarked path to the right to ascend once more.
  • Climb a stile at the summit and follow a grassy path which leads you to a gate into a field. This in turn takes you into Treffgarne Farm yard.
  • Leaving the farm follow a lane leading south from which there are marvellous views westwards across Treffgarne Gorge towards Treffgarne Rocks and Maiden Castle.
  • This lane descends steeply to a hairpin bend, and across a mill bridge before climbing to a crossroads. Turn right here and at the next crossroads turn right onto a path signposted ‘Wood Park'. This leads you down behind a small cottage and onto a narrow path that eventually exits onto a further small lane. Turn left here and follow the lane back to Salem Chapel car park.
  • It is worth climbing up to the chapel - a fine well preserved Georgian building constructed in 1827 and renovated in 1874 and 1909.

 

ID: 237, revised 24/10/2017

Dyffryn Gwaun

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your town has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes at the Harbour Car Park, Lower Fishguard is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this short riverside walk which mixes superb river valley and sea views, interesting vernacular architecture with native deciduous woodland and associated bird life. The riverside path is wet and muddy at all seasons, so take care.

Walking: The Harbour car park, Lower Town, is a short walk from Fishguard town centre, down Tower Hill.
Bus: 410 (Fishguard Town Service) - alight at Fishguard Harbour 411 (Fishguard-St Davids-Haverfordwest) - alight at Fishguard Square 412 (Cardigan-Fishguard Haverfordwest) - alight at Lower Town Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Goodwick and connect with bus services 410, 411 and 412 Arriva Trains Wales 
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Fishguard"
Parking: There is a large, free car park on Lower Town Harbour
Toilets: Public toilets at the start and finish of the walk on the Harbour
Refreshments: Available in Fishguard town centre, up Tower Hill for the Lower Town car park

Start/Finish: Lower Town Harbour, Fishguard
Distance: 2.2 miles, 1hour
Walking Steps: 0
Terrain: Tarmac and very muddy paths
Stiles: 0
Gates: 0
Steps: 0
Bridges: 0
Views: 2
Car Park: 1

 

  • Begin the walk at the free harbour car park in Lower Fishguard, from where there are marvellous sea views (1).
  • All around the harbour are fine examples of vernacular architecture, including an old woollen mill (2).
  • Walk toward Lower Town bridge (3)
  • Cross it and turn left onto a waymarked lane (4), taking care whilst crossing the busy A487.
  • Follow this lane alongside the river (5). Eventually it narrows into a muddy path - cross a small stream and you enter stretches of native deciduous woodland with beautiful water meadows on the opposite riverbank (6).
  • Eventually it narrows into a muddy path - cross a small stream and you enter stretches of native deciduous woodland with beautiful water meadows on the opposite riverbank (6).
  • Keep on this path as it undulates alongside the river (7), past a ruined building, over a slippery culvert, and up a slope with a stone wall to the left.
  • The path deviates from the river and there are stunning views back down the valley towards Lower Fishguard (8).
  • Eventually the path approaches the river again and then rises alongside it on a fascinating river terrace (9).
  • Finally, you descend towards the river again, passing a second ruined building and arrive back at the river. The path is impassable here and often flooded (10).
  • Turn around and walk back, enjoying the pleasures of this delightful riverside walk for the second time.

 

 

 

Bus Timetables

ID: 238, revised 24/10/2017

Blackbridge Circular Walk (Milford Haven

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your town has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes on the new Marina at Milford Haven docks is one of a number of town and country walks which has been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this medium length walk that mixes marvellous river valley and estuary views, interesting local architecture with beautiful woodland and associated bird life. The riverside path is wet and muddy at all seasons, so take care. 

This most interesting walk mixes both urban and rural scenery. It includes aspects of both the modern and historical environments of the old fishing port of Milford Haven and stunning rural walking in the pretty wooded valley of Castle Pill and around the Milford Haven estuary itself. This is very much an environment in the process of change. Both rural and urban sections contain fascinating sculptural works, a response to this change. 

Begin the walk at Nelson Quay car park - a new development on Milford Marina, itself an extension of the old Milford Haven fishing port. Allow time at the beginning or end of the walk to explore this area that not only contains many shops and attractions (such as Milford Haven Museum) but is also a working port where pleasure boats and commercial shipping mix together.

 

Walking: The Marina car park, on Milford Haven docks is a short walk from Milford Havne town centre.
Bus: 300/302 (Withybush - Hubberston) - alight at Charles Street or St Lawrence Hill, both in Milford Haven. 315 Puffin Shuttle (Marloes - Haverfordwest) - alight at Tescos, Milford Haven. 356 (Monkton - Milford Haven) - alight at Tescos, Milford Haven Bus Timetables 
Train: Nearest station is at Milford Haven, a short walk from the Marina Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Milford Haven".
Parking: There is a large, free car park on the Marina dockside
Toilets: Public toilets at the start and finish of the walk on the Marina and in Milford Haven town centre.
Refreshments: Available in on the Marina or in Milford Haven town centre. Both locations have a wide variety of cafes, restaurants and public houses.

Start/Finish: The Marina, Milford Haven docks
Distance: 3.86 miles, 2/3 hours
Terrain: Easy to moderate on roadways, urban footpaths, bridleway, rural paths, quiet lanes, and the foreshore (there is an high tide alternative). Can be wet, muddy and slippery in places.
Stiles: 0
Gates: 4
Steps: 22
Bridges: 1
Views: several
Car Park: 1    

 

  • Walk from Nelson Quay towards Barrallier House and Quay and then east along the promenade in front of a new apartment block.
  • When you reach a slip way, walk up it towards The Rath, turning right after Pier Road and walk along the path that takes you through parkland below The Rath with views along the Milford Haven waterway to your right.
  • Bear right off this path where it merges with a cycle path (3), go downhill through a gate and bear right up a short hill around the stoney escarpment of an old hill fort.
  • Just after turn right onto a narrow urban path that takes you to Beach Hill road where you turn right down towards the estuary.
  • Turn left and proceed along the foreshore towards a small boatyard at the foot of Cellar Hill
  • Continue along the foreshore until you reach a disused lime kiln and take the waymarked lane that rises up towards Coombs Road.
  • This section along the foreshore is worth taking for the lovely riverside views. However, it is impassable at high tide but there is an alternative route along an inland path from Beach Hill road (turn left and right immediately instead of right down to the estuary) to the lime kiln - it is the section you will follow when returning.
  • Turn right onto Coombs Road and walk downhill towards Black Bridge, but take care this is a busy road without a pavement, until you reach the bridge
  • Cross the bridge and turn left onto a path that immediately forks. The upper path, towards a house, is a bridleway.
  • Follow the lower path along the estuary itself (10)- this is an old path that used to serve eight cottages upstream on Castle Pill. Only one cottage remains, Vineyard Cottage.
  • After this cottage turn left through a ford and up a quiet lane the curves steeply around the remains of an earthwork castle that gave the pill its name.
  • Just before Castle Pill farm take the waymarked path to your left which descends back towards the pill through lovely woodland (12). This section has been the subject of upgrading recently and contains some interesting wooden shelters and carved wooden sculptures reflecting the flora and fauna of the area.
  • At the bottom of the hill, cross the bridge and turn left immediately following the stream that flows here
  • Keep on this path, ignoring a path on the right that would take you uphill, as it follows the stream and then begins to rise into denser woodland, with more glorious estuary views on your left, and descends towards a gate leading you back onto Black Bridge.
  • Turn right and retrace your steps along Coombs Road, turning left onto the lane towards the lime kiln near the 30mph sign. Don't follow the path down to the foreshore but bear right at the lime kiln onto a narrow, leafy path which takes you to Cellar Hill. Turn left here and almost immediately turn right by a house onto another narrow, leafy urban path. You won't miss it because outside the house here is a fine collection of old enamel signs advertising long gone Milford businesses!
  • When this path descends to Beach Hill road, turn right and walk uphill towards Murray Road. Turn left here. This road leads onto The Rath - a road lined with fine buildings on the right and overlooking the busy Milford Haven waterway on the left. As you walk along here, past the first bandstand, take time to look at some of the monuments - these include a minelayer memorial to ‘Operation Overlord' (the WWII Norwegian invasion), a bronze plaque showing a map of the waterway, and a stunning sculpture commemorating the fishermen of Milford.
  • Below you will also see the landscaped gardens of the former Milford Lido.
  • Eventually you reach a junction of The Rath with Hamilton Terrace and Slip Hill (outside the British Legion club). Turn left down Slip Hill (18), onto the slipway itself, and then turn right along the promenade back towards Nelson Quay where your walk began.
  • Walk along a stunning green lane until you reach a stepped section on your left. Descend, turn left at a large tree and continue down more steps . The path then levels off, rises and bears right. Do not take the more obvious path to the left, by a ruined building. Suddenly a house appears in front of you!
  • Time for some well earned refreshment as you sit admiring the vessels in the new yacht basin!

 

 

Bus Timetables

ID: 239, revised 24/10/2017

Stepaside Ironworks Walk (Tenby - Saundersfoot)

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your town or village has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes in the Ironworks car park, Stepaside, is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this walk which mixes scenic coastal walking with an enclosed inland  woodland walk in a quiet valley. The route follows the old railway line built in 1835 to link Saundersfoot Harbour with Stepaside Ironworks. 

The walk is quite short and flat and therefore suitable for walker of all ages and abilities. 

Coal has been mined in Pleasant Valley since the 14th century and by the early 19th century there were over 12 collieries around Stepaside; the ironworks was onstructed nearby in 1848. A railway was built to link these industrial activities with Saundersfoot Harbour in 1835 and this short, flat walk follows the route of that line. 

Walking: Stepaside Ironworks is a short walk from Stepaside village.
Bus: 350 (Tenby-Amroth-Tenby) and 351 (Tenby-Pendine). Alight at Pleasant Valley. Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Kilgetty. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: Multimap website www.multimap.com Search for "Kilgetty"
Parking: Stepaside Ironworks is served by a large free public car park
Refreshments / Toilets: These are available at both Wisemans Bridge and Saundersfoot. Wisemans Bridge is at the halfway point of the walk.

Start / Finish: Stepaside Ironworks
Distance: 1.9 miles (3.6km) - 2 hour (approx)
Terrain: Flat tarmaced or similar roads, paths and lanes. Suitable for all ages and abilities.
Stiles: 0
Gates: 2
Steps: 0
Bridges: 0
Car Park: 1
Views: 3

 

  • Begin the walk in the car park at Stepaside Ironworks and take some time to admire the buildings.
  • Of particular architectural note are the remains of the Engine Blast House and the Casting House which has a striking three bay gabled front of dressed stone with three arches.
  • Leave the ironworks, turn right onto the road and, shortly after passing the old mill, right again through a gate and onto the newly refurbished old railway route.
  • This route takes you through the lovely old woodland of the aptly named Pleasant Valley. Depending on the time of the year you walk this route, there will generally be an abundance of plant and wildlife to observe.
  • This new path ends at a gate with Tramway Cottage on your right.
  • Turn left onto a lane and follow it down towards Wisemans Bridge.
  • Just before the coast is reached the lane divides. Take the right fork and at the beach there are some excellent coastal views along Wisemans Bridge beach towards Amroth.
  • Both beaches were used for the D-Day invasion rehearsals in 1944.
  • When you reach the beach, cross the road and bear right following the old railway line.
  • Eventually you reach a tunnel. A bit further along there is a second tunnel, cut into some spectacular sedimentary rock bedding planes, which takes you out onto Coppet Hall beach.
  • Follow the path around towards the toilets. Unusually, on the wall of these modern toilets is a remarkable frieze by the artist Simon Hedger, commemorating the area's industrial heritage. Ahead of you is a third tunnel.
  • When you exit this tunnel you are in the coastal resort of Saundersfoot. Walk on towards the harbour where there are plenty of opportunities for refreshment before retracing your steps back to Stepaside.

 

 

ID: 240, revised 24/10/2017

Templeton Airfield Interior Circular Walk

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This pleasant and interesting short walk within the perimeter of the former Templeton Airfield is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council.  

Templeton Airfield was one of a number of airfields constructed in Pembrokeshire as part of the UK's defences during WWII - Milford Haven was an important port that needed protection. Although no buildings remain, the runways can still be seen and give an idea of the size of the airfield. These days the main activity is sheep grazing! 

Set in the middle of typical Pembrokeshire landscape this walk, which is part of Pembrokeshire County Council's multi-user route, is fairly flat with the majority of surfaces being stone or tarmac, with some grassland. It is therefore suitable for people of all ages and abilities. Ideal for families with, perhaps, small bikes and push chairs as well as older persons who like easy, none too strenuous walks.

Walking: The walk begins and ends by the storage centre at Thomas Chapel crossroads, south west of Templeton.
Bus: Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Narberth. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Templeton, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a small parking area outside the storage centre perimeter where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are public toilets in the car park at Templeton.
Refreshments: There is a small shop, a café, and a public house in Templeton.

Start/Finish: Thomas Chapel crossroads.
Distance: 2.6 miles  1 hour
Terrain: This is a relatively easy short route across stone paths, tarmac and grass. As part of the multi-user route, it is accessible to persons of all ages and abilities.
Stiles: 0
Gates: 3
Steps: 0
Bridges: 0
Views: several
Car Park: 1

 

 

 

  • The walk begins at the storage centre, Thomas Chapel crossroads, south west of the village of Templeton. A gate gives access to a waymarked stone path that heads northwards across the airfield. After crossing a main runway and two minor ones the path enters a small wooded copse.
  • Ahead is a gate which leads onto a lane - this is part of another longer route. Ignore this and turn left.
  • You now follow another waymarked route that takes you back across the airfield in a south westerly direction. Soon the stone path ends but the route is well waymarked and across fairly firm grassland through gorse bushes and across three major runways.
  • At the end of this path there is a gate which takes you onto a lane (4). Turn left here and you can walk back to Thomas Chapel crossroads.
  • Alternatively, turn left before the gate and head towards two large telecommunication towers in the near distance within the airfield perimeter (5) - this is not waymarked but a permissive path opened courtesy of the MOD.
  • Go through a gate to the left of the telecommunication towers and the path brings you back to the start, near the storage centre at Thomas Chapel crossroads.

 

 

 

 

ID: 241, revised 24/10/2017

Stepaside Ironworks Circular

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This walk which starts and finishes at the Stepaside Ironworks car park is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

This short walk takes in the historic industrial sites of Stepaside Ironworks and Grove Colliery. It links with the Miners Walk  - both long and short versions - as well as the Stepaside to Saundersfoot Walk. All four walks offer a fascinating glimpse into Pembrokeshire's industrial past as well as beautiful views of the local landscape.

Additionally, long sections of all these walks utilise the new multi-user path, a path which is accessible to walkers of all ages and abilities. 

South Pembrokeshire once had a thriving coal and iron industry of which little evidence remains today but Stepaside Ironworks and the nearby Grove Colliery have been superbly restored to afford the visitor a glimpse into this rich heritage.

This short walk takes you around these two sites as well as offering splendid views of the local landscape.

It also links with two other web walks. From Stepaside Ironworks you can walk down the new multi-user path to the coast at Wiseman's Bridge and along, via a disused railway line, to the port of Saundersfoot, from where the coal and iron was exported.

Additonally, this walk links, via beautiful country lanes, with the Miners Walk (long and short versions) which begin in the nearby village of Kilgetty. Several sections of these walks utilise the multi-user path and are therefore suitable for all ages and abilities - there are plenty of pick and mix options that do not involve full hiking gear!

 

Walking: The walk begins and ends at the Stepaside Ironworks free car park.
Bus: 350 Tenby-Amroth-Tenby (Summer Sundays only) and 351 Tenby-Pendine Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Kilgetty. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Stepaside, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a free car park at Stepaside Ironworks , where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are public toilets in Kilgetty.
Refreshments: Kilgetty village has a number of shops, cafés and a public house.

Start/Finish: Stepaside Ironworks free car park.
Distance: 1.1 miles, 1 hour
Terrain: This is a short walk over tarmac, multi-user path, gravel and grassy paths - the latter are quite steep.
Stiles: 2
Gates: 1
Steps: 85
Bridges: 2
Views: several
Car Park: 1

 

  • Stepaside Ironworks (1) is on your right a short walk southwards from the large free car park. An information board gives details of the history of the site.
  • After admiring the archaeology, cross the bridge opposite the site and turn right onto the multi-user path (2). This path continues on to Wiseman's Bridge and Saundersfoot.
  • For this walk though, after travelling a short distance, turn right again, and walk past the children's play area and across a bridge from where there are lovely views across water meadows down the valley.
  • Continue following the waymarked path as it rises steeply into the wooded hillside. Where the path forks (4), take the left hand option and continue uphill until you climb a stile onto a narrow country lane.
  • There are panoramic landscape views from here with, on fine days (as they nearly always are in Pembrokeshire!), the sea visible glistening in the distance to the south
  • If you wish to link with the Miners Walk, turn right onto the lane here (6), then right again a short distance along onto another lane and follow it into the village of Kilgetty - the Miners Walk begins and ends at the Community Centre there.
  • However, to continue on this short circular walk, retrace your steps downhill until you reach the waymarked fork where you turned left earlier.
  • Turn left here and immediately on your left are the restored remains of Grove Colliery (7). There is an information board here too.
  • After exploring the ruins, continue on the easy gravel path through picturesque woodland (ignoring steps on your right) until you find yourself on a fenced platform above the Ironworks itself.
  • There are more good views here as well as the opportunity to study how these buildings were constructed (8).
  • Continue on this path until you see some buildings ahead of you. Turn right before them and a gentle slope takes you back to the car park which will be seen a short distance away.

 

 

ID: 242, revised 24/10/2017

Canaston Woods Walk

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your  neighbourhood has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes at  Canaston Bridge is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

This medium length walk involves a circuit of the lovely Canaston Woods, including visits to the historic Mounton Chapel and Blackpool Mill. This route has been the subject of upgrading and, although sections of it remain steep, it is not too strenuous if taken at a relaxed pace.  

Canaston Woods is crossed by numerous paths, all of which make for enjoyable walking in this area of beautiful mixed woodland. The woods are bisected by the main path, the Knights' Way, an ancient pilgrim's route between St Davids Cathedral to the north west and Amroth on the south east coast of Pembrokeshire. The Knights' Way is at the heart of this walk, encompassing pleasant diversions to the medieval chapel of Mounton near the most southerly point of the woods and the nineteenth century mill at Blackpool, on the western edge of the woods. 

Many of the paths have undergone upgrading recently and underfoot surfaces are generally firm. However, the paths remain muddy in places and there are some strenuous sections which shouldn't prove too troublesome provided they are taken at a gentle pace! 

Walking: The walk begins at the lay-by south of Canaston Bridge.
Bus: 322 - Carmarthen to Haverfordwest and 382 - Tenby to Haverfordwest. Alight at Canaston Bridge. Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Haverfordwest. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Canaston Bridge, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a lay-by immediately south of Canaston Bridge where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are no public toilets on this walk.  
Refreshments: None

Start/Finish: Lay-by south of Canaston Bridge.
Distance: 4.8 miles, 3 hours
Terrain: This medium length walk has been subject to much upgrading and takes in tarmac lanes as well as stony, grassy and muddy paths. Certain sections are steep but not too strenuous.

Stiles: 1
Gates: 2
Steps: 0
Bridges: 1
Views: several
Car Park: 1
 

  • The walk starts in the lay-by south of Canaston Bridge road junction. Follow the minor road signposted ‘Blackpool Mill'. After a short distance walking on this tree lined lane you will see a waymarked bridleway on your left. This is the Knights' Way.
  • Walk up this steeply rising bridleway to the top where it meets the main road. Cross here with care - it is a busy road!
  • Don't follow the main track ahead of you but bear slightly to the right and follow a recently laid, narrow stone path. It is waymarked. Continue to follow this path as it undulates and rises gently through a coniferous plantation and, after a pair of gates, into older deciduous woodland.
  • Keep straight on at a waymarked junction in the path. It becomes quite rocky underfoot here but shortly, on your left, there is a stile in the hedge.
  • Climb over into the field and ahead of you is the ruins of the 15th century Mounton Chapel, sadly now in a state of decay so investigate the ruins with caution.
  • Retrace your steps out of the field, over the stile and back downhill to the path junction you passed earlier. Turn right here and follow it upwards to a crossroads where it meets the main Knights' Way once more. Turn right onto this path and follow it as it narrows and descends.
  • On your left, just before a ford, is a further waymarked path that rises into denser woodland. Take this path. It forks shortly in a clearing where you should bear left.
  • You now skirt the hidden ramparts of an old Iron Age fort before exiting into another clearing where there are fine views northwards towards the hilltop village of Robeston Wathen and the Preseli Hills beyond
  • Continue on this path until it reaches the main Knights' Way once more. Turn right and follow it to the main road. Cross once again with care and walk back downhill to the lane. At the bottom do not turn right back towards Canaston Bridge but turn left and soon the magnificent Blackpool Mill will be seen on the river bank to your right alongside a splendid single arch bridge spanning the Eastern Cleddau.
  • After exploring the mill and grounds, retrace your steps to Canaston Bridge.

 

 

ID: 243, revised 07/11/2017

Cilgerran Wildlife Park Circular Walk

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes at Dolbadau car park in Cilgerran is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this medium length relatively easy walk from the riverside at Dolbadau car park, Cilgerran through lovely woodland to the Wildlife Centre and back again.  The return journey is along an old railway track - use this route both ways for very easy, flat walking. The walk can be combined with the Cilgerran Gorge walk for a longer and more varied route. 

 

Walking: The walk begins and ends at Dolbadau car park, Cilgerran .
Bus: 230 (Cardigan - Carmarthen, occasional Wednesdays only); 430 (Cardigan - Narberth); 431 (Pentre Galar - Cardigan).
Bus Timetables 
Train: Nearest station is at Clynderwen. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a free car park on the riverside at Dolbadau, Cilgerran, where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are public toilets at Dolbadau car park and at the Wildlife Centre.
Refreshments: Served in Cilgerran village and at the Wildlife Centre.

Start/Finish: Dolbadau car park on the riverside at Cilgerran.
Distance: 3.9 miles, 2 hours
Terrain: This is a relatively easy medium length walk - outwards along woodland pathways and returning via a tarmaced cycleway and minor roads.
Stiles: 1
Gates: 4
Steps: 7
Bridges: 1
Views: several
Car Park: 1

 

  • This walk begins alongside the Teifi at Dolbadau car park, Cilgerran from where there are splendid views up and down Cilgerran Gorge (1). The building in the car park has a series of fascinating plaques displaying the natural and social history of the area.
  • Walk up the lane towards Cilgerran village, turn right onto High Street, right again into Castle Square and follow the lane up to the church. You might like to take time out to explore both the castle and church at this point.
  • Bear right at the church gates and almost immediately afterwards take a waymarked footpath that takes you to a bridge across a stream. Follow the path between houses up onto a further lane. Almost directly ahead of you is another waymarked path that leads onto a lane through meadows with stunning rolling landscape views on your left.
  • Where the lane divides, go through a gate into lovely old deciduous woodland and continue on the path as it winds through the trees, past rock outcrops on your right and meadowland on your left. Keep on this path, bearing right at a fork onto the signposted permissive path, bearing left at the next fork (the right fork is signposted ‘tree hide'), until you see the modern ‘glasshouse' that is the Wildlife Centre on your left.
  • Don't go to the centre just yet but continue on the path a short distance until you reach a T-junction.
  • To the right is the Cilgerran Gorge path (subject of a separate walk). Turn left and a few metres along is a viewpoint towards the beautiful Teifi river
  • Continue past this viewpoint and turn left onto a lane that leads up past some old quarrymen's house to the new ‘glasshouse' Wildlife Centre. Here you will find an exhibition and refreshments as well as stunning views from the elevated picnic area north across the Teifi Marshes to the ancient port of Cardigan and beyond.
  • The Wildlife Centre is at the heart of a number of well-marked short trails that take in the wide diversity of this marvelous habitat which is rich in animal and bird life at all times of the year. Pick up a map at the centre information desk.
  • When you are ready, continue south along the lane away from the Wildlife Centre towards the car park and onto an old railway line that is now a cycle track and access road to the centre. This lane eventually brings you out on the western edge of Cilgerran. Turn left and follow the main road until you see the turning on your left for Dolbadau car park.
  • Those who prefer a very easy route can walk to and from the Wildlife Centre along the old railway line. It is relatively flat and suitable for multi-users. And those who prefer a more challenging walk might like to link this walk with its companion, the Cilgerran Gorge walk.

 

 

 

 

 

ID: 244, revised 24/10/2017

Monkton Circular Walk (Pembroke and Pembroke Dock)

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your town or village has to offer. This pleasant and interesting circular walk which starts and finishes outside the medieval church in Monkton is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this walk which mixes magnificent views of Milford Haven waterway, lovely deciduous woodland, and sites of historical and architectural interest, including Monkton Church, Pembroke Castle and Mill Pond, plus the Victorian town and dockyard of Pembroke Dock which is overlooked by the magnificent Defensible Barracks.   

Begin this walk in the small free car park outside Monkton Church. The church and associated Priory's origins predate that of Pembroke Castle. Walking: The Monkton Church car park is a short walk from Pembroke town centre.


Bus: 356 Monkton - Milford Haven (via Pembroke, Pembroke Dock & Neyland) and 357 Monkton - Pembroke Dock (via Pembroke). Alight at Monkton Post Office. Bus Timetables 
Train: Nearest station is at Pembroke. Pembroke Dock is also nearby. Arriva Trains Wales 
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Pembroke"
Parking: There is a small, free car park outside Monkton Church.
Toilets/Refreshments: These are available throughout Pembroke town centre, which is only a few hundred metres from Monkton. They are also available at Pembroke Dock town centre which is only a few hundred metres from the walk's mid-point in Pennar.


Start/Finish: Monkton Church car park, Pembroke.
Distance: 5.1 miles, 2 ½ to 3 hours
Terrain: A broad mix of tarmaced minor road walking plus grass, gravel, and muddy paths. Some sections can be difficult following inclement weather. Other sections are steep and can be quite demanding. Only the walk around Pembroke Castle and the Mill Pond is flat tarmac and therefore suitable for wheelchairs, prams and cycles.
Stiles: 7
Gates: 3
Steps: 5
Bridges: 3
Views: 5
Car Park: 1

 

  • The church is well worth a visit, especially for its noted Romanesque arch and for the unusual view of the castle from the churchyard.
  • Once you've enjoyed visiting the church, walk down a steep narrow medieval lane towards Bridgend Terrace where you turn left and head for Monkton Bridge.
  • Turn left at the start of the bridge onto a path around the castle pond.
  • When you reach the sluice gates you have stunning views not only of the castle (4) itself, but downstream towards Pennar Gut and upstream towards the secluded Mill Pond and the old quayside of Pembroke.
  • Shortly after the gates, turn left at a gap between the new riverside houses and left again at a waymarker in Rocky Park which takes you across a small field, through a gate, and onto a lovely undulating path that crosses several streams and runs through deciduous woodland.
  • On your left along this section are superb views of the Pembroke River, an arm of the Milford Haven waterway, up which sailing ships once travelled to reach the port of Pembroke
  • After crossing the final stream, walk up hill and across several fields.
  • The path crosses a small lane and is clearly waymarked throughout; this section is part of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park.
  • Just before you come to another path that bears right and descends steeply alongside Sycamore Woods
  • Look left towards the river and you will see the location of the first dockyard to be built in the Victorian new town of Pembroke Dock
  • Follow this path downhill and onto a track which leads up into the Bufferland suburb of Pembroke Dock. At the top of Sycamore Street a narrow path leads you onto Treowen Road.
  • Turn right here and then first left into Cross Park. At the end of Cross Park, turn right onto a path that circles the Golf Course, Pennar.
  • As you reach the summit of this path on Barrack Hill you are afforded stunning views not only of Milford Haven Waterway but also of the Victorian grid iron layout of Pembroke Dock and its associated former Royal Dockyard, now an Irish Ferry terminal.
  • On your right is the imposing structure of the Defensible Barracks, perhaps the finest of a number of defences constructed along the Haven during Napoleonic times when a French Invasion was feared. (A similar fort can be viewed on the Hubberston Circular Walk).
  • Walk past the fort and through a modern housing estate until you come onto Treowen Road once more. Turn left and then right immediately alongside a chapel onto High Street. Follow this road as it leaves Pembroke Dock along a ridge. Open country is soon reached from where there are views northwards towards the Preseli Hills.
  • Cross the road at a controlled crossing and take the second right into what is now Pembroke Comprehensive School, bearing left at the bottom of the hill and passing the grand Bush House on your left.
  • The former home of the Meyrick family which owned large areas of land locally is now a nursing home but retains its imposing façade and outlook south towards Pembroke Castle.
  • When you reach Bush Hill, the main road between Pembroke Dock and Pembroke, turn right and walk down hill.
  • Once in Pembroke, cross the Mill Bridge, turn right into the Quayside car park and follow the path around the castle, noting the amazing Wogan's Cavern in the castle walls.
  • Admission to the cavern can only be gained from the castle itself. At the main road, turn right across Monkton Bridge, up Bridgend terrace' and right onto the medieval lane that brings you back to the start of the walk at Monkton Church.

 

 

ID: 245, revised 24/10/2017

Narberth – Blackpool Mill Walk

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This walk which starts and finishes at the Town Moor car park in Narberth is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

This medium length but fairly easy walk starts in the historic market town of Narberth from where you walk through beautiful Pembrokeshire lowland landscape and Canaston Wood to Blackpool Mill, on the banks of the Cleddau River, and then back to Narberth. Nearly all of the walk utilises newly upgraded multi-user paths and quiet country lanes. The walk links with several other web walks produced by Pembrokeshire County  Council.  

This walk begins and ends at the Town Moor car park in the historic market town of Narberth.  Allow time to explore this beautiful town, its architecture, boutique shops and many fine eating and drinking establishments (although the drinking should perhaps be left until after the walk!). The town, which is mentioned in the Mabinogion, a book of ancient Welsh tales, also boasts a Norman Castle and a fine art gallery, The Oriel, in the Queens Hall on High Street. Other web walks begin and end here - you can devise longer or shorter versions of these walks to suit your abilities and the time available to you. 

 

Walking: The walk begins and ends at the Town Moor pay and display car park, Narberth.
Bus: 381: Tenby - Haverfordwest - Tenby. 391; Glandy Cross - Narberth. 322: Carmarthen - Haverfordwest. 430: Cardigan - Narberth. The 322 and 381 routes also service Canaston Bridge which is a short walk from Blackpool Mill for those who do not wish to walk back to Narberth. Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Narberth. Arriva Trains Wales 
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Narberth, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a pay and display car park at the Town Moor, Narberth, where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are public toilets in Narberth.
Refreshments: Narberth has a wealth of shops, cafés, restaurants, and public houses.
Start/Finish: Town Moor pay and display car park, Narberth.
Distance: 3.73 miles, 3 ½ hours
Terrain: This is a medium length easy walk over multi-user paths, quiet country lanes and some grass tracks.
Stiles: 3
Gates: 0
Steps: 0
Bridges: 0
Views: several
Car Park: 1

 

  • From the Town Moor car park take the multi-user path that descends into woodland to the south west of the town.
  • Keep following this path downhill (from where the are lovely lowland landscape views) until you reach a bridge across a small stream. Immediately after this, at a waymarked crossroads, turn right and follow the path until it reaches a narrow country lane. Turn right again and walk towards Canaston Wood which can be seen in the near distance.
  • When you reach the edge of the woodland, ignore a bridleway sign on your left, walk a short distance further until you reach a waymarked footpath on your left. Climb the stile here, cross a small field and climb over a second stile. You are now on the northern edge of Canaston Wood - an extensive, attractive woodland of mixed deciduous and coniferous trees.
  • Follow this grass path as it snakes southwards alongside a small stream. Where the path opens out into a plantation of young trees there is a small waymarked crossroads. Take the left fork, travel on a short distance until you come out onto a much wider path - this is the new multi-user route that traverses the woodland from east to west and which follows part of the route of the ancient Knight's Way, the pilgrims' route that once linked the south of the county with St Davids Cathedral in the northwest. Turn right and follow this undulating path through fine stands of both deciduous and coniferous trees until you reach a main road. Cross this road with care and continue on through the woods down towards the Cleddau River.
  • As you follow this main path, you will see many other smaller paths that cross it - they form part of a network that covers the whole of Canaston Wood and are well worth exploring if you have time. This section in Canaston Wood also links with other web walks which include one to Mounton Chapel and, further afield, a series of walks based around the medieval village of Templeton which can, if so desired, take you even further south to the historical heritage sites at Stepaside. 
  • Meanwhile, back on the main walk. As you near the Cleddau River you exit the woods onto a country lane. Turn left and a very short distance along, turn right onto a drive - ahead of you is the magnificent Blackpool Mill which was built in 1813.
  • Alongside it is the equally impressive single-arch bridge over the Eastern Cleddau (5). Cross this bridge and you are on a further network of paths in Slebech Woods, to the north of the river.
  • On the other side of the Mill, there is a gate which links with a series of fine walks towards Minwear woods along the south bank, right on the edge of the modern Bluestone Holiday village.
  • For now, perhaps, it is enough to rest, admire the stunning architecture and the river views, and enjoy a well earned cake or two and a cup of tea from the Mill café before setting out back towards Narberth.

 

ID: 247, revised 09/11/2017

Cleddau Reach Circular Walk (Pembroke Dock)

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your town has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes at Cleddau Reach, Waterloo, Pembroke Dock is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council.

Enjoy this medium length, not too strenuous walk around the edges of Pembroke Dock which affords beautiful riverside views and gives fascinating glimpses into the maritime, military and social history of this Victorian ‘new town'.

This is a fascinating and beautiful walk around the edge of Pembroke Dock and takes in all the riverside locations of this interesting Victorian ‘new town' as well as affording insights into the maritime, military and social history of a town that was created in the 19th century around The Royal Dockyard. Even though the dockyard closed in 1926, Pembroke Dock still played an important role in the UK's military history, evidence of which is seen on this walk.

Architecturally and scenically, Pembroke Dock has as much to offer the walker as the more fashionable Pembrokeshire towns and resorts.

 

Walking: Cleddau Reach, Waterloo is a short walk form Pembroke Dock town centre.
Bus: Bus routes 333, 349, 356, 357, 358, 361, 362, 387, and 388 all serve Pembroke Dock. Alight at Waterloo, Tescos or Laws Street. www.pembrokeshire.gov.uk/bustimetables
Train: Nearest station is at Pembroke Dock, a short walk from Cleddau Reach. National Rail Enquiries: 08457 484 950 www.nationalrail.co.uk
Road Map: www.multimap.com Search for "Pembroke Dock".
Parking: There is a large, free car park at Cleddau Reach, Waterloo
Toilets: Public toilets Pembroke Dock town centre and approximately half way through the walk at Hobbs Point.
Refreshments: Available in Pembroke Dock town centre where there is a wide variety of cafes, restaurants and public houses. Pembroke Ferry, near the start of the walk, has two licensed premises that serve food - The Ferry Inn and The Cleddau Bridge Hotel

Start / Finish: Cleddau Reach, Waterloo, Pembroke Dock
Distance: 7.55 miles (10.6 kilometres), 3 hours
Terrain: Easy to moderate on roadways, urban footpaths, rural paths, and the foreshore (there is a high tide alternative). Can be wet, muddy and slippery in places. One strenuous section out of Llanreath.
Stiles: 0
Gates: 1
Steps: 10
Bridges: 0
Car Park: 1
Views: several

 

 

  • Begin the walk at Cleddau Reach, Waterloo where there are stunning estuary views. Walk past the Activity Centre, turn left and then right uphill towards the Technium Centre. Take the first exit at the first roundabout and the second exit at the next roundabout (which is on the approach road to the Cleddau Bridge).
  • The road forks at the hotel in front of you - bear right downhill towards Pembroke Ferry, a hamlet right in the shadow of the bridge. This is one of the oldest crossing points on the Cleddau Estuary.
  • The Wesleyan chapel, built in 1880, is an interesting example of vernacular architecture.
  • Retrace your steps up hill, but don't go all the way back up, instead, where the houses end, bear right onto a narrow path that takes you into Llanion - now a modern housing estate but once the Edwardian Barracks, some evidence of which still remains - walk along this road, onto a narrow path between houses, then upon reaching another road, turn right downhill onto Pier Road.
  • Turn right here and walk to Hobbs Point where there are marvellous views up and down river. Hobbs Point was the last crossing point of the river prior to the construction of the Cleddau Bridge, which can be seen in all its modern beauty from here.
  • Once again retrace your steps along Pier Road, past the point where you came down from Llanion, on towards the roundabout at Lidls.
  • Turn right onto Western Way Way – where you have fine views of the former Royal Dockyard -  and just after the pedestrian crossing by Asda, turn right onto Front Street - the oldest street in Pembroke Dock has a lovely river frontage and takes you to the edge of the Royal Dockyard itself, protected here by the first of two guntowers.
  • This one houses the town museum. In the dockyard wall in front of you are 6 bronze relief panels by renowned sculptor Perryn Butler depicting scenes from the town's history.
  • Inside the dockyard walls can be seen the huge hangars, built to accommodate the Sunderland flying boats which were stationed here in WWII.
  • Turn left and walk along the wall up Commercial Row, a street that contains several unaltered shop fronts . At a small crossroads, turn right still following the wall.
  • On your left is the newly restored Market Hall, a superb building.
  • Continue straight on into the dockyard itself, passing on your right the Garrison Theatre, one of the finest of all of Pembroke Dock's 19th century buildings.
  • Continue walking along a tree lined avenue, past many other fine buildings in local stone until you see the main dockyard entrance on your left.
  • Go through it and turn right onto Fort Road. Walk past the hospital on your left until you come to another guntower at the edge of the dockyard.
  • Once again there are splendid river views here.
  • If it is low tide, you can walk around to Llanreath, a hamlet whose beach is visible a 100 metres away to your left.
  • Alternatively, retrace your steps along Fort Road via the hospital grounds from the elevated position of which you will see, inside the dockyard walls, Paterchurch Tower - the enigmatic oldest surviving building in Pembroke Dock.
  • When you reach the dockyard gates you recently exited from, turn right up hill and at the next junction, with the tree lined Barrack Hill in front of you, turn right again and shortly afterwards, turn left onto a grassy path that leads up the hill and onto a car park at the edge of the golf course.
  • Go through a gate alongside the car park and walk into Llanreath hamlet. The road bears sharp left and at the next junction, turn right and walk down a very steep hill to Llanreath Beach, another ferry point where dockyard workers used to embark and disembark.
  • This is the point you will have arrived at if you have walked around the foreshore from Fort Road guntower.
  • Walk back uphill but continue straight on at the junction where you turned right on your way down. This road leads you onto the golf course, bear left towards the car park, then right and cross the golf course towards the magnificent Defensible Barracks - an amazing Victorian fort built as part of the defence system for the Royal Dockyard which can be seen laid out at the bottom of the hill.
  • The whole grid iron layout of Pembroke Dock can also be seen from here, as well as stunning landscape views as far as the Preseli Hills to the north.
  • If you are lucky with your timing, you might see the Irish ferry berthing in the dockyard.
  • Continue past the Defensible Barracks into a housing estate. Turn left, then left again onto Treowen Road then right immediately at Bethany Chapel onto High Street. Follow High Street on the left hand side, past the Red Rose public house, and across a road which leads you onto a cycle path.
  • A short distance along this path, turn left onto another path that takes you downhill and into the Memorial Park - an interesting formal park. Exit the park beneath the clock arch and walk down Argyle Street at the end of which you should turn right and then shortly afterwards bear left onto a narrow path that follows the railway line.
  • After a few hundred metres there is a level crossing on your left - cross it with care and walk down towards the roundabout on the main road. Cross this road and go straight on alongside a road signposted Haverfordwest. A short distance along this road, turn right into Warrior Way. Follow this road back to Cleddau Reach.

 

 

 

ID: 248, revised 24/10/2017

Cilgerran Gorge Circular Walk

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This interesting, very strenuous walk which starts and finishes at Dolbadau car park in Cilgerran is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this medium length quite strenuous walk from the riverside at Dolbadau car park, Cilgerran through lovely woodland to the Wildlife Centre and back again along the banks of the river Teifi before moving to higher woodland.  Points of interest include Teifi Gorge, the Wildlife Centre, plus Cilgerran Castle and Church. The walk can be combined with the Cilgerran Wildlife Centre walk for a shorter, easier route.

 

Walking: The walk begins and ends at Dolbadau car park, Cilgerran .
Bus: 230 (Cardigan - Carmarthen, occasional Wednesdays only); 430 (Cardigan - Narberth); 431 (Pentre Galar - Cardigan). Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Clynderwen. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Cilgerran, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a free car park on the riverside at Dolbadau, Cilgerran, where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are public toilets at Dolbadau car park and at the Wildlife Centre.
Refreshments: Served in Cilgerran village and at the Wildlife Centre.

Start/Finish: Dolbadau car park on the riverside at Cilgerran.
Distance: 4.2 miles, 3 hours
Terrain: This is a strenuous medium length walk - outwards along gentle woodland pathways to the Wildlife Centre and returning via undulating paths up and down the steep sided Cilgerran Gorge.
Stiles: 3
Gates: 6
Steps: 288
Bridges: 5
Views: several
Car Park: 1

 

 

  • This walk begins alongside the Teifi at Dolbadau car park, Cilgerran from where there are splendid views up and down Cilgerran Gorge. The building in the car park has a series of fascinating plaques displaying the natural and social history of the area.
  • Walk up the lane towards Cilgerran village, turn right onto High Street, right again into Castle Square and follow the lane up to the church.
  • The church tower is of thirteenth century origin although the main body of the church dates from the nineteenth century.
  • There is a curious standing stone in the churchyard. On it is a Latin inscription as well as traces of Ogham - the earliest form of writing known in these islands.
  • Bear right at the church gates and almost immediately afterwards take a waymarked footpath also on the right that takes you to a bridge across a stream. Follow the path between houses up onto a further lane.
  • Almost directly ahead of you is another waymarked path that leads onto a lane through meadows with stunning rolling landscape views towards Cardigan on your left.
  • Where the lane divides, go through a gate into lovely old deciduous woodland and continue on the path as it winds through the trees, past rock outcrops on your right and meadowland on your left. Keep on this path, bearing right at a fork onto the signposted permissive path, bearing left at the next fork (the right fork is signposted ‘tree hide'), until you see the modern ‘glasshouse' that is the Wildlife Centre on your left.
  • If you have time, take a detour to the ‘glasshouse'. The Wildlife Centre is at the heart of a number of well-marked short trails that take in the wide diversity of this marvellous habitat which is rich in animal and bird life at all times of the year. Pick up a map at the centre information desk. Here you will find an exhibition and refreshments as well as stunning views from the elevated picnic area north across the Teifi Marshes to the ancient port of Cardigan and beyond.
  • Back on the path, continue north until you reach a Tjunction. Turn right and you are on the beautiful gorge trail which begins by following the banks of the Teifi and passes some old quarry workings.
  • The path is very narrow but affords superb river views. Also the condition of the path here has become dangerous, and a new path has been constructed that rises through woodland to follow the side of the gorge at some distance from the river bank.
  • This undulating section of the route is very steep and rocky and involves climbing several hundred small steps with hidden precipitous drops to the left. It is a rewarding yet strenuous path suitable for the serious walker only.
  • The path emerges near the old farm of Forest. Bear left and back into woodland. The broadleaved woodland gives way to a wider track through a larch plantation. Bear right after crossing a footbridge and climb a stile on the right that takes you into a field. Follow the left hand edge to locate a further stile in the far corner. Turn right onto a lane, and then left between some houses down to a bridge over the stream.
  • You are now ascending the path past the church you went down several hours previously and can return to the start point at Dolbadau car park by retracing your route. However, if you have time, stop to view the ruins of Cilgerran Castle, sited on a rock outcrop above the steepest part of the gorge. Also, when back in the car park, you might like to walk a short distance downstream, past the information plaques, until you are beneath the castle. There are more fine river views here. Follow the Cilgerran Wildlife Park walk for a much easier but equally pleasant version of this walk.

 

ID: 249, revised 24/10/2017

Plumstone Mountain Circular Walk

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This pleasant and interesting walk which starts and finishes at Plumstone Mountain is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council. 

Enjoy this medium length relatively strenuous walk around Plumstone Mountain which rewards the walker with some of the finest scenic panoramas in Pembrokeshire. There is also much flora, fauna and sites of historical importance to view on the route.  

This fascinating walk begins and ends at Plumstone Mountain, a rock outcrop in north Pembrokeshire, and takes the walker across common land around Plumstone Mountain, through the Causeway Coniferous Plantation, before skirting to the south of Dudwell Mountain and returning to the start point. The walk has some steep slopes and very muddy ground so come prepared. However the walker will be rewarded with some of the finest scenic panoramas in the whole of Pembrokeshire. 

 

Walking: The walk begins at Plumstone Mountain, north of Haverfordwest on the B4330 to Croesgoch.
Bus: 342 (St David's-Haverfordwest)- ask to be put off at Plumstone Mountain. Bus Timetables 
Train: Nearest station is at Haverfordwest. Arriva Traibns Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com. Search for "Plumstone Mountain, Haverfordwest".
Parking: There is a small car park at Plumstone Mountain, where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are no public toilets on this walk.
Refreshments: There are no refreshments available on this walk, so bring your own!

Start/Finish: Plumstone Mountain car park.
Distance: 3.75 miles, 3 hours
Terrain: This is a strenuous walk over terrain that can be very muddy at times with some steep sections - so come prepared.
Stiles: 3
Gates: 6
Steps: 0
Bridges: 0
Views: several Car Park: 1

 

 

  • Begin the walk at Plumstone Mountain car park. Do not head for the mountain outcrop but walk back along the lane you have just travelled up taking time to admire the first of many spectacular views. In this case, it is the Preseli Hills in the distance across rolling farmland (1). At the B4330, turn right and walk downhill to Lady's Cross. Take care as this is a fairly busy road.
  • Turn right onto a bridleway. Almost immediately to your right you will see, beyond the hedge, the wooded mound that is all that remains of an Iron Age fort.
  • At the end of this lane, where it forks, go straight on, through a gate then, after a second gate, turn left alongside a fence to follow the well marked path across the southern edge of Plumstone Mountain common. Although this is common land, there are no open access rights, so please keep to the well marked paths.
  • The traditional management of commons such as this consisted of annual burning and grazing by sheep and cattle but, with the cessation of burning, the common has become dominated by Welsh Gorse and Heather with flowers growing where the vegetation is more open. The common is a favoured hunting ground for Owls, Harriers and Buzzards.
  • As you walk along the southern edge there are many paths branching off towards Plumstone Mountain which can now be clearly seen on the skyline to the north (3), but keep to the left where the forks occur, heading towards Causeway Plantation in the near distance.
  • There are splendid views to the south of the county.
  • Eventually you reach a third gate beyond which the path broadens and winds to a lane. Turn left onto this lane which takes you into Causeway Plantation. The plantation has mainly Lodgepole Pine and Sitka Spruce where birds such as Long-tailed Tits, Goldcrests and Tree-Creepers are usually found as well as thousands of roosting Starlings. Other animals to be seen on this walk include adders, lizards, foxes, badgers and, of course, horses.
  • When you exit the plantation turn right onto a lane, then right again alongside a farmhouse and walk up a steeply sloping footpath with open country side to your left, the conifers to your right. Where the conifers end, climb a stile on your left, turn right into a field and then a short distance northwards, climb another stile, go through a gate, and back onto the common land south of Dudwell Mountain.
  • Rest awhile here and enjoy some spectacular views - especially westwards where Roch Castle looms on a distant ridge overlooking St Bride's Bay. There are glimpses of the sea!
  • To the north west the massive rock outcrops around St David's can be plainly seen (8), with perhaps the even more distant Ramsey Island. When you've had your fill, follow the path downhill to the south east, past a curious pile of broken rocks, across the common towards the plantation again.
  • Go through a gate and onto a bridleway that takes you through sun dappled woodland (if you are lucky!) towards a final gate where you are back on the common. Soon after a clearly waymarked footpath crosses the bridleway.
  • When you reach the ridge you'll observe some prominent tumuli on your left which you might like to explore, otherwise turn right and walk up to the outcrop of Plumstone Mountain
  • Now at the end of your walk, just circle the great rocks and admire the breathtaking views across many miles in all directions. It is great fun trying to identify landmarks, including man-made ones, that are to be seen.
  • Finally, head past the rocks back to the car park. Time to visit a local town or village for some well earned refreshment perhaps!

 

 

ID: 250, revised 13/10/2017

Miners Walk (long version)

It's good to walk, so why not step out and sample some of the walks your neighbourhood has to offer. This medium length walk which starts and finishes at the Community Centre car park in Kilgetty is one of a number of town and country walks which have been produced by Pembrokeshire County Council.

This walks follows the route of the Miners Walk along the new multi-user path from Kilgetty towards Thomas Chapel then continues along lanes and grassy paths though Kilgetty Wood. It links with the short and easier version of the Miners Walk as well as the Stepaside Ironworks Circular Walk. All three walks offer a fascinating glimpse into Pembrokeshire's industrial past as well as beautiful views of the local landscape.

The Miners Walk is an historical walk that links a number of historic industrial sites in south Pembrokeshire. It also offers beautiful views of the local landscape and an opportunity to spend a few relaxing hours in unspoilt countryside. This long version of the walk uses the new multi-user path as well as more strenuous paths. It also connects with the Stepaside Ironworks Circular Walk (for further details see elsewhere on the web walks site).

Begin the walk at the Community Centre car park in Kilgetty and walk westwards along the pavement towards the roundabout. Cross the road and continue westwards past the Begelly Arms Hotel until you see a gap on your right between two bungalows - Camelia and Tara.  

 

Walking: The walk begins and ends at the Community Centre car park in Kilgetty.
Bus: 381 Tenby - Haverfordwest. Alight at Kilgetty post office Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station is at Kilgetty. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: www.multimap.com Search for "Kilgetty, Pembrokeshire".
Parking: There is a free car park at the Community Centre, Kilgetty, where the walk begins and ends.
Toilets: There are public toilets in the Community Centre car park.
Refreshments: Kilgetty village has a number of shops, café and public house.

Start / Finish: Community Centre car park, Kilgetty.
Distance: 6 miles (9.5 kilometres), ? hours
Terrain: This is a short, easy walk over pavements and the multi-user path
Stiles: 22
Gates: 11
Steps: 0
Bridges: 5
Car Park: 1
Views: several

 

 

  • The path between these bungalows takes you up onto the Miners Walk - this section forms part of the newly created multi-user path (1).
  • The surface is fine for prams, wheelchairs, and for anyone with a sturdy pair of footwear. Full hiking gear is not required! This is part of the short version of the walk.
  • Follow this path across beautiful south Pembrokeshire pastureland, through copses of deciduous woodland, and through five gates.
  • At the sixth gate you reach a lane on the edge of the hamlet of Thomas Chapel. This is where the Miners Walk short version returns to Kilgetty.
  • As you are on the long version of the Miners Walk, cross the lane, climb over a stile, and follow the path as it weaves its way through further woodland, past a ruined mill (4), and across pastureland.
  • Upon reaching another lane, turn left, then immediately right onto a farm track. At the farmyard turn left, go through a couple of gates and cross several fields until you reach the A478.
  • Cross this busy road with great care, bear left and turn right shortly afterwards onto a country lane. Follow this lane until you reach a railway bridge. Turn left here onto another farm track. Walk down it past two houses then go through a gate and down a short grassy slope and turn right onto a wider path.
  • You are now back on the Miners Walk with splendid views south over Ford's Lake Valley and heading into Kilgetty Wood. 
  • Shortly after crossing a brook, do not follow the seemingly obvious path but turn right at a waymarker and over two stiles into a field which leads into Penrath Caravan Park. On the far side of the Caravan Park are two gates. Take the left option leading to a green lane and across several fields.
  • This takes you back into a beautiful deciduous section of Kilgetty Wood.
  • Soon this becomes a coniferous plantation and there is a delightful change in atmospheres. At the end of the conifers there is a gate which takes you into a final field.
  • Cross the field and a stile, turn left into a lane and you return to the main road through Kilgetty village. Turn right on the main road back towards the Community Centre.

 

 

ID: 251, revised 13/10/2017

Haverfordwest Race Course Walk

This is a pleasant and interesting circular walk at the end of the old racecourse. Walk this gently undulating walk at your leisure, and imagine how the horses galloped in days gone by.

Walking: If you live in Haverfordwest you can walk to the start of this walk. Head down Dale Road to get to Haverfordwest Cricket Club.
Bus: 301 (Haverfordwest Town Circular) Get off on Dale Road and walk down Dale Road, away from town, to get to the cricket club.
311 (Haverfordwest - Broad Haven) Get off at Belle View and walk down Dale Road to get to the cricket club.
Bus Timetables
Train: Nearest station - Haverfordwest Arriva Trains Wales

Start / Finish: Haverfordwest Cricket Club, Dale Road
Distance: 3 miles (Longer Walk) 11/2 hours
Walking Steps: This route is: 6,000 steps
Terrain: Grass, tarmac, various walks; some can be muddy after rain. The Northern half of racecourse path has inner tarmac path suitable for wheelchairs and prams.
Stiles: 2
Gates: 4
Sets of Steps: 1
Car Parks: 2
Views: Race course, Haverfordwest

 

 

  • This pleasant and interesting walk offers a number of variations to suit all types of walker. This is an out of town walk, on the Dale Road in the western area of Haverfordwest, and starts in the public car park opposite the Haverfordwest Cricket Clubhouse.
  • To start the walk, cross the B4327 Dale Road and, keeping the Cricket Clubhouse on your left, enter the Race Course itself which is clearly signposted.
  • Begin walking across a gently rising grass meadow, between huge mature hedges, which is what remains of the old Race Course. You will surely be able to imagine what it was like in days gone by when horses galloped around this course, urged on by large crowds of race goers!
  • At the top of this slope, the course turns left in a large graceful curve. This then opens out to a marvellous view of the long broad North straight, at the end of which you approach the B4327 again. Cross this road once more, with care.
  • After crossing the road enter the South part of the Race Course through a gate.
  • The race course is less defined now, with mature hedging only on your right. To the left it has been removed to accommodate several football pitches. A short distance along the path enters a small copse of deciduous woodland.
  • Continue walking through this copse until the path broadens again. At this point you can choose whether to continue with the walk, or take a short-cut back to the start:
  • To continue the longer walk turn right through a white kissing gate in a gap in the hedge or to take the short-cut continue around the race course and back to the cricket clubhouse
  • To continue the longer walk turn right through a white kissing gate in a gap in the hedge, which brings you onto a narrow tarmaced road.
  • Cross the road and go through another white painted kissing gate, which is clearly waymarked and enter a beautiful narrow shady green lane that begins descending gradually into the valley.
  • Follow this lane for some distance.
  • As the path flattens out, you will see a tree growing in the path.
  • At this point you need to turn left, over a small eroded hedge bank and down four steps to continue the walk on an atmospheric little path alongside a deep channelled stream.
  • Continue along this winding, gently undulating path, always keeping the stream to your right.
  • Eventually you reach a stile, which takes you into the corner of a field.
  • Immediately to your right you will see another stile. Climb over this stile to get back onto the path alongside the stream.
  • All too soon you come to the end of this magical path where it meets a narrow tarmaced road.Turn left and follow this road which rises quite steeply.
  • Just over the crest of the hill the road dives into some woodland and you will come to a signposted T-junction, where you must turn left again and follow this new road uphill once more.
  • Almost immediately on your right there is a gate through which unusual views of Haverfordwest can be seen. St Caradoc's Holy Well is also nearby. Holy wells are a feature of the Pembrokeshire landscape, reflecting an environment steeped in Celtic spirituality.
  • At the top of the hill there is another T-junction and you will see the white painted kissing gate you came through earlier, which takes you back onto the Race Course. Go through the gate and turn right immediately and follow the South curve of the course and walk up the final grassy straight, keeping the hedge on your right.
  • At the end of this walk you will find yourself back at the car park where you began your walk, which you access through a gate.
  • A much shorter walk, and ideal for the disabled or families with prams, can be taken around the North part of the Race Course.
  • Within the original grassy perimeter, inside one of the great hedgebanks, is a flat, tarmaced path complete with seats. The start and finish of this walk is shown in photographs.

 

ID: 252, revised 17/10/2017

Haverfordwest Fortunes Frolic Walk

This pleasant and undulating circular walk takes you from Haverfordwest town centre along Fortune's Frolic, Higgons' Well and St Ismael's church before re-tracing your steps back to the town centre.

Walking: If you live in Haverfordwest you can walk to the start of this walk. Head down Salutation Square and County Hall.
Bus: The start of this walk is a few minutes from Haverfordwest bus station
Pembrokeshire Bus Routes: Bus Routes - Pembrokeshire
Train: Nearest station - Haverfordwest. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: Multimap - Search for "Haverfordwest"
Parking: There is a car park off Cambrian place, past the army building on your right, on the Frolic Road.

Start / Finish: County Hall Car Park
Distance: 3.13 miles - 1hr 45mins - 2 hours (approx)
Walking Steps: This route is: 16,500 steps
Terrain: Varying between tarmac, gravel and grass may be muddy after rain, one steep climb and one steep descent. This walk has easy access from the Frolic Car Park, the first section of the walk is flat, however the surface at present is not suitable for prams and wheelchairs
Stiles: 4
Gates: 4
Sets of Steps: 2
Car Parks: 1
Views: Over the Cleddau towards Haverfordwest

 

  • There are two starting points: a) Start the walk behind County Hall and follow the path along the river's edge, and through the park. At the end of the path walk under the road bridge, turn left and follow the track to the Frolic Road. At the road turn right, under the railway-bridge, and along the road into Fortune's Frolic car park. b) Alternatively start walking from Pembrokeshire County Council's County Hall car park, after a few paces carefully cross the A476 road in front of county hall and turn right, along the side road, past the army building on your right. Continue to the end of this road, which leads to fortune frolics car park.
  • Next to the car park is an information board, turn left and follow the single grassy track road, keep on this path with the river to your right.
  • If you live on the Uzmaston Road you can join the narrow, waymarked path at the railway bridge, which drops steeply to Fortune's frolic. Turn left at the bottom and follow the single-track grassy road.
  • The path narrows to a single track, leading past Higgon's Well house on your left. Walk in front of the house and continue along the path, passing Higgon's Well on your right which is reputed to have never dried up.
  • Go through the kissing gate and proceed along the narrow path taking in the wildlife and along the Cleddau River, which includes Canada Geese, Mallards, Kingfishers and Swans.
  • Cross a stile and enjoy the river views back to Haverfordwest before the path turns inland to the left and begins to rise steeply, negotiating 23 steps.
  • Go through the gate at the end of this steep section and continue forward along the tree root covered path as it opens in to a field.
  • Cross the field towards St Ismael's churchyard, which is easily seen on the brow of the hill. There is a gate into the churchyard with two small steps. Walk thorough the churchyard and over a stone style on the far side which leads onto the main road in the pleasant hamlet of Uzmaston.
  • Follow the tarmacadem road for a short distance until you rejoin the gated footpath on your left. Once through the gate follow the lovely farm lane which eventually opens out were several farms lanes meet. Bear right here and you will see a stile ahead of you.
  • Climb over the stile and follow a wellmarked sunken path that slopes gently down through a field towards another style. Climb over the style and follow the narrow descending path through deciduous woodland.
  • This path becomes steeper and crosses a spring where railway sleepers have been added to make walking easier.
  • At the bottom of the wooded path you rejoin the river path you followed earlier. Turn right here and retrace your steps towards Higgins's Well and the Fortune's Frolic.

 

ID: 253, revised 17/10/2017

Hubberston Circular Walk (Milford Haven)

This pleasant and interesting circular walk which starts and finishes in the Harbour car park Milford Haven, mixes magnificent views of Milford Haven waterway with sites of historical and architectural interest, including Milford Marina and Docks plus St Davids Church, Hubberston.

Walking: The car park beneath Victoria Bridge, adjacent to Tescos Store is a short walk from Milford Haven town centre.
Bus: 300 (Milford Haven town service), 302 (Haverfordwest-Milford Haven), 315/400 (Puffin Shuttle) and 350 (Monkton-Milford Haven). On all services, alight at Milford Tescos.
Pembrokeshire Bus Routes: Bus Routes - Pembrokeshire
Train: Nearest station is at Milford Haven. Arriva Trains Wales
Road Map: Multimap - Search for "Milford Haven"
Parking: There is a large, free car park beneath Victoria Bridge, adjacent to Tescos Store.
Refreshments / Toilets: These are available at the start and finish of the walk on Milford Haven harbourside. They are also available approximately halfway through the walk at Gelliswick Bay where there are public toilets and where Pembrokeshire Yacht Club is open to the public.

Start / Finish: Car Park beneath Victoria Bridge, Milford Haven

Distance: 3.4 miles (5.5 km) 1hr 30mins to 2 hours
Terrain: A broad mix of tarmaced minor road walking plus grass, gravel, and beach paths. Some sections can be muddy following inclement weather. Other sections are steep and can be quite demanding. Only the walk from the start to Hakin Point and back is flat tarmac and therefore suitable for wheelchairs, prams and cycles but this can only be accessed when the dock gates are open.
Stiles: 0
Gates: 1
Steps: 76
Bridges: 1
Car Park: 1
Views: 5

 

  • Begin this pleasant walk, which combines urban and rural outlooks, in the car park beneath Victoria Bridge, adjacent to Tescos Store, Milford Haven. Right at the start there are magnificent views of the old fishing harbour and the modern marina.
  • Climb the steps below Hakin Bridge and use the pedestrian crossing to cross the busy road and turn right into St Anne's Road.
  • Walk up this road with the docks below on your left and take the first left into Hill Street.
  • Walk down Hill Street and when you reach the public house turn left through the dock gates and immediately right along an old dock road that takes you to Hakin Point from where you have stunning views up and down Milford Haven waterway.
  • If the dock gates are locked, retrace your steps up Hill Street and take the first left into Vivian Drive, then left into Nubian Crescent and left once more into Chapel Street.
  • At the bottom of Chapel Street you can turn left to admire the view at Hakin Point and then turn right onto a narrow enclosed path. This path soon opens out and becomes a lovely cliff top walk with more beautiful views of Milford Haven waterway and its' associated industrial developments - this is a great place to view shipping movements in the Haven.
  • Eventually the path descends and forks. Take the left fork into a wooded section at the end of which is a waymarker pointing left and right. The right turn is an easier walk but the left turn is far more interesting.
  • Turn left and you descend a short series of steps which takes you onto a very narrow walkway above the beach. More steps take you down onto the beach.
  • Walk a short way along the shingle to an old arch in the cliff wall on your right. Go through this arch and walk up a narrow path into Conduit Lane at the end of which you must turn left onto Picton Road. The housing in this area is mixed and has fine examples of domestic architecture ranging from the Victorian through to inter-war developments.
  • Continue up Picton Road, past both Westaway Drive and Gorsewood Drive on your left, until you reach a junior school.
  • Go down the narrow green lane to the right of the school.
  • It descends rapidly and ends in a short but steep series of steps that takes you onto the approach road to Gelliswick Bay where once again there are interesting river views.
  • Also of great interest is Hubberston Fort part hidden on the cliff to your left. This magnificent fort is part of a series of defences built along Milford Haven during the Napoleonic Era when a French invasion was feared.
  • Walk along Gelliswick Bay, past the Pembrokeshire Yacht Club, and turn right at a waymarked sign pointing inland towards a narrow wooded valley.
  • A path now leads you into this valley - it runs alongside a pretty brook surrounded by ancient deciduous woodland. All too soon you cross a footbridge and begin walking up hill on a rocky zig-zag path that emerges alongside the fenced Hubberston Childrens' Recreation Ground.
  • Turn left and follow the fence, go through a gate, along a lane behind some houses, then turn right onto St Lawrence Hill, the main road back into Milford Haven.
  • As you walk along this road into Hubberston, Church Road is on your right and it is well worth taking a short diversion down this road to view St David's Church (although it is only open on certain Wednesdays).
  • Continue on down Saint Lawrence Hill, bearing left at Waterloo Road, Hakin until you reach Hakin Bridge. Cross the road, descend the steps and you are back in the car park where you began the walk.
  • If you are not too tired there are many interesting buildings to view in and around the harbour and marina, including a museum that tells the interesting tale of Milford Haven's fascinating history.

 

 

ID: 254, revised 17/10/2017