Cycle Pembrokeshire

|Name like '%Brunel Trail%'|Route like '%Brunel Trail%'

Brunel Trail

Overview
Information

     The Trail follows the route of the rail link built between 1852-6 under the direction of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the most famous of all Victorian Engineers. From Merlins Bridge you pass through the water meadows of Cinnamon Grove and ascend to a small plateau offering panoramic views across open countryside.

    You then descend into the solitude of Bolton Hill Woods. Once through the railway cutting at Johnston, the Trail runs along the track bed of the former Great Western Railway leading eventually through Westfield Pill Nature Reserve, Neyland Marina and on to the southern end of the route at Brunel Quay.

    On returning to Haverfordwest, relax on the river bank alongside County Hall and admire the views, or walk to the remains of the town’s Castle or Priory. Cross the footbridge and the Priory is about 300 yards to the left by the side of the river. Alternatively cross the road bridge and the castle is up a flight of steps leading from Castle Square on the right. Cycle stands are available at weekends on the river side of County Hall and others available at all times at the north-eastern and north-western ends of the nearby multi-storey car park, and at the railway station.

     

    Fact File
    Highlights

    Mostly off-road linking Haverfordwest with Johnston and Neyland – once the terminus of Brunel’s Great Western Railway. Sites include woodlands, a wildlife reserve, Brunel Quay and the picturesque Cleddau estuary. A medieval castle and priory await your return. This Trail includes the shorter Westfield Trail.

    Grade: Moderate Trail Grading Statement

    Distance

    19miles (30 km)

    Time 4 hours plus additional time for stops
    Start/Finish County Hall, Haverfordwest (Grid Ref SM956155, Sat Nav SA61 1TP). County Hall can be seen from Salutation Square Roundabout, Haverfordwest and the entrance is signed. The car park is available (free) for users of the Trail at weekends. Other nearby car parks are available on weekdays (charges apply) and all have cycle paths (on the road side) that connect to the start of the Trail
    Nearest Station Haverfordwest  1/4 mile (cycle path leads to start of Trail)
    Terrain Mainly on a tarmacked traffic free path with a few minor road crossings. Some gentle uphill sections between Haverfordwest and Johnston but reasonably flat or very shallow sloping elsewhere
    Elevation Total climb (sum of all uphill sections)  -  317 metres
    Refreshments

    Cafe on Brunel Quay (with cycle stands), Johnston and Haverfordwest

    Alternative start

    Brunel Quay, Neyland (Grid Ref SM966048, Sat Nav SA73 1LS) (5 miles from Johnston Station)

     

    Trail Directions (distances in miles)

    0.0       Start. Turn right out of County Hall following the cycle path adjacent to the busy Freemans Way road

    1.1       Carry straight on alongside roundabout, cross road at signals following National Cycle Network Route 4 signs for Neyland. Just beyond McDonald’s the path again crosses   the road and continues on for about 250 yards. Turn left at the first turn

    1.5       Continue straight on passing the entrance to Under the Hills Caravan Park. After about 150 yards turn left over bridge following Route 4 sign for Neyland. Continue on this path for nearly 2 miles

    3.5       Cross road and continue on path through Bolton Hill Woods. This next section is a surfaced bridleway with small gates that will need to be opened and closed

    4.3       At the ‘T’ junction on the Trail turn left over a cattle grid. This next short section also serves as a farm access so be aware as you may encounter an occasional motorised vehicle. After crossing the railway bridge, turn right onto the traffic free path

    4.9       Carry straight on (path to left leads into Johnston village and railway station). You will soon be following the route of a disused railway leading all the way down to Westfield Pill Nature Reserve and Neyland Marina. On route take care at 3 minor road crossings

    8.5       Carry straight ahead on the low level path (Route 4 parts company with the Brunel Trail at this point, leading up the hill on the right and over the high level bridge you see ahead). Follow the Trail under the bridge

    8.9       Start of the section of Trail alongside Neyland marina. Take care as this is no longer traffic free although vehicle usage is light and the road is traffic calmed. The Trail  continues past a waterfront cafe (with cycle stands) and on past a number of boat yards to the Brunel Quay car park

    9.5       Brunel Quay car park. Turn around and follow the same route back to Haverfordwest

    19.0     County Hall, Haverfordwest – end of Trail

     

    Points of Interest along the Way
    1. Haverfordwest Castle. Interesting remains of a Norman castle overlooking the town and surrounding area. It was later used as a prison up until 1878. The Town Museum is housed in the former Governor’s house in the castle grounds. Entry to the castle is free at all times but fees apply for the museum which is open April to October (10am to 4pm), Monday to Saturday.

    2. Haverfordwest Priory. Remains of an early C13th Augustinian priory with the only surviving ecclesiastical medieval garden in Britain.

    3. Bolton Hill Woods. A traditional broadleaf woodland with secluded stream. There is evidence of early coal mining in the woods

    4. Westfield Pill Nature Reserve. A sheltered inlet with lagoons and islands which provide a sanctuary for hundreds of different species of birds and animals including herons, otters and over 20 varieties of butterfly

    5. Neyland Marina. One of the largest and prettiest yacht havens in Wales

    6.  Brunel Quay. Until the mid C19th, Neyland was a quiet fishing village. In 1856, the renowned engineer Brunel established an Irish Packet Service at what was then named ‘New Milford’, and developed a wide range of infrastructure projects including a quay and rail link to support the ferry service. Numerous information boards on the quayside detail the history of this exciting project. The ferry service ended in 1906 and the railway closed in 1964. This part of Neyland languished until its transformation under an ambitious regeneration plan drawn up in the mid 1980s. Brunel Quay has impressive views of the Cleddau Bridge and Estuary

    ID: 3692, revised 14/08/2018
    |Name like '%ard%'|Route like '%ard%'

    Cardi Bach Trail

    Overview
    Information

      The Trail starts near the former railway station at Cardigan and very soon winds its way into Pembrokeshire along a section of disused railway line affectionately known as the Cardi Bach. The railway closed in the early 60s as did so many other branch lines in the country.

      There are future aspirations to open up the route from Cardigan all the way to Whitland as a community walking and cycling trail but progress will, of course, be dependent on many factors.

      On the Trail you will have an opportunity to visit Cilgerran Castle and church, as well as the Wales Wildlife Centre. It is also worth visiting Cardigan Castle if time allows at the end of the Trail – just continue on the cycleway alongside the river to a set of cycle stands near the end of the old bridge. The castle is on the other side of the bridge with the entrance just up the hill.

       

      Fact File
      Highlights Teifi river and marshes, wildlife and castles

      Grade: Easy  Trail Grading Statement
      Distance 51/2  miles (9 km)
      Time 11/4 hours plus additional time for stops
      Start/Finish The Old Station, Cardigan (Grid Ref SN181458, Sat Nav SA43 3AD) Approach Cardigan town from the south (B4546) and at the bottom of the hill turn right into Station Road (signed Pentood Ind. Est. on the downhill approach). Where Station Road bears right, turn left and immediately right past the old disused railway station building and platform on the left. The Trail starts at the end of this lane
      Nearest Station None within 5 miles
      Terrain Traffic free and quiet lanes. Mostly flat with a couple of gentle hills at the Cilgerran end of the Trail and on the Wildlife Centre approach
      Elevation Total climb (sum of all uphill sections)  -  89 metres
      Refreshments Wildlife Centre, Cilgerran and Cardigan
      Toilets Cardigan Castle, Wildlife Centre, Cilgerran Castle, Coracle Centre

       

      Trail Directions (distances in miles)

      0.0       Start. Just beyond the Old Station, Cardigan, cycle under the bridge and on through the Teifi Marshes Wildlife Reserve on a traffic free path

      0.7       Straight on at access to Wales Wildlife Centre on left

      2.1       Turn left at bottom of short hill (just prior to a ‘T’ junction) following cycle route sign. Follow this back road towards Cilgerran. You will pass the St Llawddog Church on the right.

      2.6       Immediately after a sharp right turn in the road, turn left along a narrow road. Cilgerran Castle is a very short distance up this road on the left. After visiting the castle, turn around and follow the same route back to the Wales Wildlife Centre. If you want to spend more time at Cilgerran, turn immediately left outside the castle access along a very narrow track that leads to a ‘T’ junction. There are cycle stands if you turn right out of this junction. Take time to explore the village on foot or walk down to the nearby Coracle Centre alongside the river. Then return past the castle entrance along the same narrow track as before

      4.5       Turn right for a visit to the Welsh Wildlife Centre. There are cycle stands on site. Then return, turn right at the Centre access and head on through the Wildlife Reserve once again and on to the end of the Trail.

       

      Points of Interest along the Way
      1. Cardigan Castle. Dates back to C12th and location of the first Eisteddfod in Wales in 1176. Open 10am – 4pm (11am – 3pm winter). Fees apply

      2. Teifi Marshes Wildlife Reserve. One of the best wetland reserves in Wales. Allow time for plenty of stops for spotting wildlife. Perhaps you’ll see the blue flash of a kingfisher in flight, an otter or the water buffalo that graze the marshes

      3. Wales Wildlife Centre. Award winning Visitor Centre nestled in lush countryside along the banks of River Teifi. Includes the magnificent Glasshouse Cafe and shop. Open 10am – 5pm (10am – 4pm winter)

      4. Cilgerran Church. Early medieval on site of C6th Celtic church. Famous for its megalithic standing stone in the churchyard on which the ancient Ogham script can still be seen. Unfortunately the church itself is sometimes locked

      5. Cilgerran Castle. A delightful C13th ruined castle. Said to be one of the most picturesque in Wales, it was painted and sketched several times by the artist Turner. It stands in a commanding position, perched on a craggy promontory, high above the River Teifi. Open 10am – 5pm (10am – 4pm winter). Fees apply except in winter

      6. Coracle Centre. Famous for the annual coracle race in August and access to lovely walks along the river through the Teifi Gorge

      ID: 3693, revised 06/08/2018
      |Start like '%west street car park%'|Route like '%west street car park%'

      Castle 2 Castle Trail

      Overview
      Information

        This interesting Trail enables users to view and explore the impressive ruined castles of Pembroke and Carew, and the lovely waterways that partly surround them including local nature reserves. You visit an ancient tidal mill, a medieval church, and even a building once used to deposit human bones

         

        Fact File
        Highlights The Trail is mostly off-road and includes some magnificent sites including castles, a tidal mill and a number of picturesque waterways and nature reserves

        Grade: Moderate  Trail Grading Statement
        Distance 13.4  miles (21.7km)
        Time 21/2  hours plus additional time for stops
        Start/Finish West Street Car Park, Pembroke (Grid Ref SM982013, Sat Nav SA71 4ET) which is a free car park. Turn into West Street from Common Road, Pembroke (junction near Pelican Crossing). After just over 100 yards turn right under a 6’6” height barrier into the car park. Make sure roof mounted bikes are removed before driving into car park. Nearby car parks (with fees) are available if the barrier presents a problem. The Trail starts at the far end of the car park
        Nearest Station Pembroke 0.6 mile (Turn left out of station on narrow path under bridge then left along path for 50 yards to ‘T’ junction. Turn right and join a path on the right just before ‘T’ junction. Cross road before roundabout and turn left after 30 yards down Goose’s Lane. Carry on alongside the old town walls, cross on the lights and carry on following the side of the park to West Street car park)
        Terrain About half the route is on a surfaced traffic free path running alongside main roads. There are a number of road crossings but traffic islands and traffic lights on the busiest ones make it easier to cross. Careful supervision of younger cyclists will, however, be necessary at these points. Gradients are generally shallow but a little steeper near the start, after Carew Cheriton (the longest uphill section), and on  the approach lane back into Pembroke. None of these hills should provide a problem to anyone used to cycling
        Elevation

        Total climb (sum of all uphill sections) - 249 metres

        Refreshments Pembroke, Milton and Carew
        Toilets Pembroke and Carew

        Trail Directions (distances in miles)

        0.0       Start. Follow the level path alongside the edge of the park, cross the road and continue on the wide path around the outside of Pembroke Castle Pond. (The castle entrance is to the right up the hill on the road signed ‘Town Centre’). About 100 yards after crossing the Castle Pond barrage, turn left and then bear left and right where the path joins a housing estate road. Follow this estate road up a gentle hill for about 200 yards until you approach a ‘T’ junction adjacent to a filling station

        0.6       Join the path on the left just before the ‘T’ junction. Continue on this path to the top of the hill and go straight ahead crossing the road signed for the Leisure Centre and Golf Course. Follow the path down the hill, negotiate the barrier and cross the   junction signed Hospital and Dockyard. At the bottom of the hill the path leads you through a short tunnel and you will then approach a signal controlled junction

        1.7       Turn right across the junction and follow the path alongside the busy A477 road road for nearly 11/2 miles

        3.0       Immediately beyond a side road crossing, the path crosses the main road. Continue across the junction of a side road signed for Cosheston and follow the path alongside  the main road for a further 21/2 miles to the village of Milton. The path turns towards the Milton Brewery Inn. Cross the side road and follow the path by the red telephone kiosk

        6.0       At the roundabout follow the path to the left towards Carew. After 500 yards you will arrive at Carew Castle car park for an optional but very worthwhile visit to the castle ruins and Carew Cross. Cycle stands are available at the entrance to the car park with toilets opposite. Take the lane running alongside the walled perimeter of the castle grounds. Just beyond the end of this wall, bear right and you will arrive at Carew Tidal Mill and barrage with lovely views over the millpond to the castle and the medieval bridge in the distance. Consider breaking your journey at this point before retracing your route back to the castle car park and on to the roundabout

        7.5       At the roundabout, carry straight on across the A477 road. Take care as this crossing can be quite busy. After 50 yards, rejoin a quiet road at the crossroads and carry on down the road signed Carew Cheriton. An optional and very brief diversion (less than one mile round trip) to the east from the above crossroads brings you to a restored   wartime control tower on the old Carew Airfield.  Unfortunately it’s only open in the summer months and usually on Saturday mornings and Sundays, but it’s well worth a visit. Heading down to Carew Cheriton for nearly 300 yards you will arrive at St Mary’s Church and The Charnel House. After a brief stop, cross the very narrow bridge on the other side of the road and follow this path for about 1/3 mile. It’s necessary to push your bike over the first section of this narrow path for safety reasons. A stroll around the Carding Mill Nature Trail may be taken if time allows

        8.0       Turn left at the end of the path just beyond the old red waterworks building and cycle up a hill for nearly a mile. Turn right before the brow of the hill onto a road signed Deer Park Lane. Follow this lane for about 21/2 miles

        11.3     Take care crossing the main A4075 road into Golden Lane (to the right of the cottage). Follow this lane for nearly a mile until you pass under a railway bridge after a fairly short uphill section. About 50 yards beyond the bridge turn left onto a narrow path just to the left of the entrance into Golden Manor Nursery. Dismount and push you bike along the first section of this path until it widens and continues alongside the Pembroke Millpond

        12.8     Cross the road at the Millpond Bridge (it is recommended that you dismount and push your bike across using the Zebra Crossing) and you will see the bronze statue of Henry Vll which was unveiled in 2017. Make your way over the bridge (push your bike along the narrow footway), turn left and you can secure your bike to the waterside railings adjacent to the Cornstore. You can then explore the town, have some refreshments or visit the castle up on the hill opposite. Afterwards follow the path all the way around the Castle Pond, across the road and along the path back to where you started the Trail

        13.4     Finish at West Street Car Park, Pembroke

         

        Points of Interest along the Way
        1. Pembroke Castle. First established in the year 1093, this is one of the most  impressive Norman castles in south Wales. The stone structure dominates the town and is partly surrounded by the picturesque Pembroke Castle Pond. A maze of tunnels, stairs, towers and battlements are waiting to be explored and numerous events are held inside the castle throughout the year. It has a rich medieval history, and was the birthplace of Henry Vll, the first Tudor King. Apart from Christmas and New Year, the castle is open daily from 10am to 4pm (longer hours in summer). Fees apply

        2. Pembroke Castle Pond. This has only been a pond since the Pembroke River barrage was built in the late 1970s and now provides a perfect setting for the castle. A variety of birdlife can be seen around the pond, even downstream of the barrage where wading birds can often be observed feeding in the mud sediments

        3. Carew Castle. A magnificent ruin of a castle with a history spanning 2,000 years. Set in a stunning location overlooking a 23 acre millpond, the castle developed from a  Norman fortification to an Elizabethan country house. There’s plenty to see and do with a varied activity programme. Open daily 10am to 5pm. Fees apply which also include entry into the nearby Tidal Mill

        4. Carew Cross. A superb 11th century decorated Celtic cross at the entrance to the castle grounds. The cross stands 13’ high and is beautifully carved on four sides with lovely Celtic knotwork and key patterns

        5. Carew Tidal Mill. Built as a corn mill in the early 1800s, now the only restored tidal mill in Wales. It has two wheels which drive six pairs of millstones. Although restored to working order, it does not operate at present but the machinery, exhibition, audio commentary and interactive displays show how water has been used as a source of sustainable energy throughout the ages. You can walk across the adjacent causeway and indeed around the whole millpond if you have time

        6. Carew Cheriton. An interesting and pretty little hamlet. The exceptionally well preserved and medieval church dedicated to St Mary houses the tomb of Sir Nicholas de Carew (died 1311) who built the nearby castle which was named after his family. In the churchyard is a 14th century charnel house (build to store exhumed human bones) with a chapel above. It was later converted for use as a school from about 1625 until 1872. The holes through which the bones were placed are clearly visible at the sides of the building

        7. Pembroke Millpond and Nature Reserve. This is a great place to visit at any time of the year. Swans are resident all year round and cormorants and heron can usually be   seen at the top end nearest to a structure known as Barnards Tower. This 13th century defensive tower is one of 6 that formed part of the medieval town walls of Pembroke

        ID: 3694, revised 06/08/2018
        |Name like '%City West Trail%'|Route like '%City West Trail%'

        City West Trail

        Overview
        Information

          A really picturesque and interesting trail which starts and finishes at the car park adjacent to Oriel y Parc Visitor Centre, St Davids. Explore the enchanted cathedral city itself and sections of the rugged coastline around the peninsula to the west.

          This has been a cultural hotspot for thousands of years and the area’s prehistoric past has certainly left its mark on Britain’s smallest city. The City West Trail blends history with scenery as it winds its way through places of beauty, peace and pilgrimage, rich in wildlife.

          If time allows at the end of the Trail, take a short trip down to Caerfai Bay a little over 1/2 mile away. Turn left out of Oriel y Parc car park and follow the road to the elevated location overlooking the lovely south facing bay and the rest of St Bride’s Bay right the way along to Skomer Island. Caerfai Bay itself is sandwiched between towering cliffs of purple sandstone and stones from nearby were used to build St Davids Cathedral 

           

          Fact File
          Highlights

          Britain’s smallest city with its cathedral and other early Christian heritage sites nearby. Superb coastal scenery on quiet lanes around the westernmost peninsular of Wales. A picturesque little fishing harbour, a superb sandy beach, lifeboat station and the dynamic Ramsey Sound

          Grade: Moderate Trail Grading Statement

          Distance

          9.1  miles (14.7km)

          Time 2 hours plus additional time for stops
          Start/Finish Oriel y Parc Car Park, St Davids (Grid Ref SM757252, Sat Nav SA62 6NW). Charges apply, generally from March to November. On the A487 approach from Haverfordwest, turn left at the roundabout and first left into the car park. On the A487 approach from Fishguard, turn left immediately after the 30 mph signs, go straight ahead at the roundabout and first left into the car park
          Nearest Station No rail station within 5 miles   
          Terrain Mostly on quiet country lanes. Gradients are generally shallow but a little steeper just after leaving Porth Clais Harbour and Whitesands, and also within the Cathedral Close. None of the hills should provide a problem for anyone used to cycling. One section follows a bridleway about half way along the Trail and this is stony and a bit bumpy.
          Elevation

          Total climb (sum of all uphill sections) - 205 metres

          Refreshments St Davids, Porth Clais, St Justinians and Whitesands
          Toilets St Davids, Porth Clais and Whitesands

           

          Trail Directions (distances in miles)

          0.0       Start. Exit the car park and turn left. (Before turning left you may wish to explore Oriel y Parc Visitor Centre and Gallery directly opposite or save this visit until the end of the trail. There are refreshments and toilets on site as well as cycle stands). After turning left out of the car park, take the 2nd right (after a row of bungalows). Then join the narrow bridleway path on the left after about 50 yards. Follow this path for nearly 1/2 mile until it joins a minor road opposite the Warpool Court Hotel. Then turn left

          0.9       Arrive at St Non’s. After a stop to visit the birthplace of St David and the Holy Well, turn around and follow the road back towards the city

          1.5       At ‘T’ junction turn left following a sign for Porth Clais. Keep on this road ignoring all side roads. Once out of the city you will follow the rim of Merry Vale which contains   the River Alun flowing from the cathedral down to Porth Clais. To your right you will notice the outlines of a number of rugged and long extinct volcanoes in the distance. Follow the hill down to Porth Clais

          2.4       Porth Clais Harbour on your left. After a brief stop, continue on the road. This is a steep uphill section of the trail as you climb out of the valley

          3.0       Carry straight on at the cross roads following the sign for St Justinians. After about 200 yards the road sweeps around the southern end of the rocky outcrop known as Clegyr Boia. At the junction with a bridleway leading to a farmhouse on the right a narrow unofficial path leads up the side of one end of the outcrop. From the top you are rewarded with an amazing 3600 panorama of the whole peninsula

          3.5       Turn left at ‘T’ junction following sign for St Justinians. Ramsey Island will come into view ahead before you finally get to the end of the road at St Justinians. Cycle stands are available for a worthwhile pause to explore the area properly. Afterwards, turn around and head back on the same road for about 1/2 mile and turn left along a road signed ‘No Through Road’. The road turns into a bridleway leading to Treleddyn after about 100 yards. Carry on along the surfaced bridleway ignoring a private sign saying ‘Footpath Only’

          5.1       Where the surfaced lane turns left at Treleddyn, continue straight ahead on a stoned track and follow this to the right just beyond the large twin-gabled house. Out of interest it was from this farmstead that the 1797 French Invasion fleet was spotted by the farmer, retired seaman Thomas Williams, who raised the alarm, alerting the troops in defence of Fishguard. This next section of the Trail is quite stony and you may prefer to dismount and push your bike. As you progress you will see a property with an unusual roof on your right. Look back to your left and you will notice a rock outcrop with a recess facing you. This is reputed to be the spot where St Patrick sheltered while awaiting the boat which would take him to Ireland. The track ahead soon improves and eventually links through to a tarmacked road

          6.0       Turn left to go downhill following a sign for Whitesands

          6.4       Arrive at Whitesands. Cycle stands are available on the left as you enter the car park and toilets and a shop/cafe are available just beyond the stands. After your visit to Whitesands, cycle back up the hill on the same road that you arrived on

          6.8       At the top of the hill turn left following a sign for Youth Hostel. Ignore the next sign for the Youth Hostel and just carry on along this same road until you get to a ‘T’ junction. Turn right at this junction (joining National Cycle Network Route 4)

          7.7       Carry straight on at the crossroads. Take care crossing this road

          8.3       Turn right just before the river bridge and carry on past the old buildings of St Davids Cathedral Close. After the road turns left, the entrance to the Bishop’s Palace ruins is on your right and the Cathedral is straight ahead. Cycle stands are available outside the Bishop’s Palace and there are toilets at the side of the footbridge. After stopping for a visit, cross the river on the footbridge and carry on up the hill past the main gates to the Cathedral on your left - don’t turn left or right at this point. You may want to dismount and push your bike up this quite steep hill. The road will soon take you under the Tower Gate Arch. Turn right immediately after the arch and follow the narrow lane for about 100 yards.

          8.7       Turn left by the Farmers Arms and take the first right into Mitre Lane. At the top of the lane turn left into Bryn Road. After 200 yards there’s a path leading off the road on the left opposite Pen-y-Garn junction. You will need to push your bike along this path which takes you past public toilets and on to the front of the City Hall where you’ll find cycle stands. This is an ideal place to secure your bike so you can explore the city centre on foot. Afterwards follow the path back to Bryn Road and turn left

          9.0       At the end of Bryn Road turn right at the ‘T’ junction and turn left at the next ‘T’ junction

          9.1       Finish at Oriel y Parc Car Park on the right

           

          Points of Interest along the Way
          1.  Oriel y Parc. A bold, semicircular and environmentally friendly building which is truly the ‘gateway’ to St Davids and this area of the National Park. It functions as a tourist office and a visitor centre and houses changing exhibitions from the National Museum Wales’ art collection. The building also has an interactive interpretation area, a discovery room, an Artist in Residence Tower, gift shop and cafe

          2.  St Non’s. Named after the mother of St David who lived in a house on the site of the ruined Chapel. This is where St David was born around the year 500AD. Near the ruins is St Non’s Well which is said to have sprung up during a thunderstorm at the time of St David’s birth. It is regarded as one of the most sacred wells in Wales and   its water is considered to have healing and other miraculous powers. Near the retreat house is a more modern and lovely Chapel built out of stones originally taken from old church buildings in the area

          3.  Porth Clais. A lovely snake like harbour built in the 12th Century to serve the city of St Davids. It was once a bustling port with ships importing and exporting goods to and from coastal communities. Timber, grain, limestone and coal were among the items traded with the latter two feeding the lime kilns on both sides of the harbour. The original harbour wall was believed to have been constructed by the Romans, and  during the Middle Ages, streams of disciples and pilgrims landed here from England, France and Ireland. Porth Clais is supposedly the place where St David was baptised

          4.  Clegyr Boia. An outcrop of very old volcanic rock and a notable landmark on the peninsula. There is evidence that it was the site of enclosed Neolithic and Iron Age settlements and later became the stronghold of the 6th Century Irish chieftain called    Boia. A tiny well named Ffynnon Lygaid on its southern side is reputed to be the source of water used to cure eye ailments. Although 50 metres above sea level, it has historically been recorded as an ‘Ebb and Flow’ well used to determine the state of the sea tides over a mile away

          5. St Justinians. A stunning location looking out over the treacherous Ramsey Sound to Ramsey Island beyond. There are two lifeboat stations, the old one which is used as the embarkation point for adventure boat trips and visits to the island, and the new one alongside which became operational in 2017. A ruined medieval chapel marks the burial place of St Justinian, a contemporary of St David

          6. Whitesands. Overlooked by the imposing craggy outcrop of Carn Llidi, this wide   expanse of fine sand curves north towards the remote rocky headland of St Davids Head. A very popular Blue Flag beach and one of the best places for surfing in the   country. The slopes of Carn Llidi and St Davids Head are littered with the remains of Neolithic monuments. It is said that St Patrick had his vision to convert Ireland to Christianity here at Whitesands, and he set sail to Ireland from the bay in the 5th Century. The bay was also the terminus of two Roman roads used for gold trading between Ireland and Southern Britain and beyond

          7. Cathedral. Built on the site of a monastery founded by St David. Work on its construction started in 1181, about 600 years after St David’s death. It endured a turbulent early history with the tower collapsing, earthquake damage and even an attack by Parliamentary soldiers. It has been rebuilt, enlarged and embellished over the centuries. It is quite a remarkable place, built, for defence purposes, in a hollow so it would not be visible from the sea. It has beautiful oak and painted ceilings, extraordinary sloping floors and wonderful restored cloisters that all contribute to its special character. The Pope decreed in the 12th Century that two pilgrimages to St David’s Shrine at the Cathedral equalled one to Rome

          8. Bishop’s Palace. Located adjacent to the Cathedral. It was built in the14th Century to house the bishops and entertain guests. It’s a ruin, but an impressive one with plenty of areas to discover including staircases to towers and undercrofts. It is looked after by CADW as a visitor attraction and entry fees apply. It is worth checking their website for opening times etc

          9.  City Centre. The city itself is named after Wales’ own patron saint and despite its city status it is really very small with a resident population of less than 2000. Take a short walk around the historic centre with its narrow streets filled with art galleries, gift shops and cafes. The 13th Century Tower Gate and the Celtic Old Cross on The Square are also worth a look. The Trail itself will have taken you to the magnificent medieval Cathedral and Bishop’s Palace in the tranquil Vale of Roses adjacent to the city centre

             

          ID: 3700, revised 12/07/2018
          |Name like '%Dramway Trail%'|Route like '%Dramway Trail%'

          Dramway Trail

          Overview
          Information

            A pleasant and interesting cycle trail which starts and finishes near the old Ironworks at Stepaside. The relatively short and flat route follows the line of the disused Saundersfoot Railway built in 1835 to link the ironworks and nearby coalmines to the harbour at Saundersfoot.

            The railway was used primarily to transport drams of coal to merchant sailing vessels moored alongside the harbour walls. At the end of the Trail take time to walk up and visit the interesting ruins of Grove Colliery. Steps alongside the nearby Ironworks lead up to the incline track and the colliery is located about 300 yards up this incline

             

            Fact File
            Highlights

            Relics of an industrial era including ironworks, colliery and mineral railway. Beaches, superb sea views and tunnels 

            Grade: Easy Trail Grading Statement                                       

            Distance

            4.0  miles (6.5 km)

            Time 1 hour plus additional time for stops
            Start/Finish

            Stepaside Ironworks Car Park (Grid Ref SN140073, Sat Nav SA67 8LT). Free car park. Turn off dual carriageway section of main A477 road just east of Kilgetty village following signs for Stepaside. Cross bridge at bottom of hill and turn left following sign for Pleasant Valley. Turn left again at bottom of hill. After nearly 1/2 mile turn right following sign for Ironworks. Car park is straight ahead

            Alternative start: Harbour Car Park, Saundersfoot (Grid Ref SN136048, Sat Nav SA69 9HE)    

            Nearest Station Kilgetty 1mile (Turn right out of station access road and take first right after Stepaside School. Cross over high level road bridge and turn left at crossroads. At bottom of very steep hill bear right just  before junction with main road. Follow track past, but not over, a narrow stone bridge and carry on until you arrive at the junction leading to the car park immediately adjacent to Stepaside Ironworks
            Terrain Mainly on a surfaced traffic free path with one minor road crossing. One short section on a quiet country road and another section on an urban cul-de-sac in Saundersfoot
            Elevation

            Total climb (sum of all uphill sections) -  5 metres

            Refreshments Wiseman’s Bridge, Coppet Hall (‘Coast’ building) and Saundersfoot
            Toilets Wiseman’s Bridge,Coppet Hall (‘Coast’ building) and Saundersfoot

             

            Trail Directions(distances in miles)

            0.0       Start. After taking some time to admire the old Ironworks buildings, cycle towards the car park exit and join the cycle path on the right just before the ‘T’ junction. Cycle alongside the stream through the aptly named Pleasant Valley. Depending on the time of the year you cycle this route, there will generally be an abundance of plants and wildlife to observe. This section of path is a bridleway so be aware that you may encounter horse riders as well as cyclists and many pedestrians

            0.8       Pass Tramway Cottage on the right and join a minor rural road ahead. Carry straight on and take a glimpse if you can at the stream to the left. This was converted into a canal in the 1790s but without much success as the gradient was too steep

            0.9       Cross the road and join the path to the right which runs alongside the beach at Wiseman’s Bridge. There are toilets to the left just before the road crossing and a pub serving food beyond the toilets at the other end of the beach. Continue on the elevated path until you reach a tunnel. A bit further along there’s a second tunnel, cut into some spectacular sedimentary rock bedding planes, which takes you out alongside Coppet Hall beach and the ‘Coast’ building. Follow the path around the land side of the car park into a 3rd tunnel. Cycling in these tunnels is not allowed for safety reasons so please dismount and push your bike through to the other end. Also this section of the Trail can be very busy with pedestrians so take care

            1.7       When you exit the 3rd tunnel you are entering the coastal resort of Saundersfoot. Carry straight on along the road ahead. You are still on the route of the old railway but be careful as this section is also used by other vehicles although these are generally few in number and slow moving. You will soon be in a street lined with shops and an outline of where the railway used to run is clearly marked in the middle of the road. Don’t follow this road around to the right. Instead carry straight on along the edge of the Harbour Car Park for about 50 yards until you reach a large building on the right – the old Saundersfoot Coal Office which was the operations hub of the coal industry in the area

            2.0       The Saundersfoot Coal Office is the point where you turn around and follow the same Trail back to Stepaside. But before doing so it is worth securing your bike to the stands adjacent to the building so you can explore the village and its harbour

            4.0       Trail finish

                  

            Points of Interest along the Way
            1.  Stepaside. This small village, set in the heart of some of Pembrokeshire’s finest countryside, was a thriving industrial community in the C19th and home to both coal mining and iron making. It was given its unusual name when Oliver Cromwell and his army passed through on route to Pembroke in 1648 and asked people in his way to step aside

            2.  Grove Colliery. An anthracite coal mine and one of many in the Stepaside area. It was developed in 1853 and has one of the deepest mine shafts in Pembrokeshire at 182 metres. Five years after its opening it was linked to the nearby Kilgetty Colliery via a half mile long tunnel. Coal from the Grove was lowered down to the Saundersfoot Railway on a self acting incline. The Grove had its own smithy, carpenters’ shop, stores and stables which housed the pit ponies. The restored ruins of the colliery are now a Scheduled Ancient Monument

            3.  Stepaside Ironworks. Opened in 1849 by the Pembrokeshire Coal and Ironworks Company, the ironworks consisted of 2 blast furnaces with blowing machines, workshops, limekilns, coke ovens and a foundry. The ore was primarily obtained from shafts driven into the cliffs between Saundersfoot and Amroth. The entrance to 2 of these can be seen on the immediate approach from Wiseman’s Bridge to the Trail’s long tunnel. The Ironworks buildings are still impressive to this day,            particularly the remains of the engine blast house and the casting house which has a striking three bay gabled front of dressed stone with three arches. Like the Grove Colliery, the ruins are now a Scheduled Ancient Monument

            4. Wiseman’s Bridge. Nestled between Amroth and Saundersfoot, this little village behind a pebble ridge and a broad sandy beach is very popular for family outings. At times when the sea is rough and the tide is low, the sand is sometimes scoured away to reveal the petrified remains of a drowned forest. Best quality anthracite was once loaded onto sailing ketches on the beach to feed the demand of cities like Bristol, Swansea and Cardiff. The Wiseman’s Bridge Inn was visited by Winston Churchill and Allied commanders in 1943 when the beach was used as a training ground for the D-Day landings

            5.  Coppet Hall. Another popular beach with golden sands and links via tunnels to both Wiseman’s Bridge and Saundersfoot. Originally called Coalpit Hall in the C19th when coal was shipped out from pits a few hundred yards up the valley

            6.  Saundersfoot. A fishing village located in the heart of the National Park and is one of the most popular seaside resorts in the UK. Long ago it was just a few medieval cottages in a forest clearing used as a hunting ground by the Norman Earls of Pembroke. Then in the C19th it grew into a thriving coal port and exported 30,000 tons annually from its harbour. When the coal industry vanished, Saundersfoot evolved into a seaside resort

               

            ID: 3701, revised 06/08/2018
            |Name like '%Last Invasion%'|Route like '%Last Invasion%'

            Last Invasion Trail

            Overview
            Information

              The Trail enables cyclists to experience the spectacular scenery in this area of Pembrokeshire and to visit a number of interesting sites including those associated with the French Invasion in 1797. On the afternoon of 22nd February of that year, four French vessels landed 1400 soldiers and weapons onto the rocky shores of Carreg Wastad, a few miles north-west of Fishguard. The invading force was under the command of an American named William Tate. The surrender two days later was generally due to poor discipline and morale of the troops, many of whom had become drunk on stolen alcohol. Many local people resisted the invaders. Most notable was Jemima Nicholas who, armed only with a pitchfork, reputedly rounded up twelve Frenchmen.

              If time allows at the end of the tour it is worth visiting the large Neolithic burial site just beyond the car park at Harbour Village which has several exposed tombs. Also the viewpoint at the end of Harbour Village has breathtaking views of the harbour, the coastline (including Fishguard Fort), and the Preseli Mountain range beyond. Numerous tearooms, restaurants, shops and pubs are available for welcome refreshments down at Goodwick itself.

               

              Fact File
              Highlights

              Last invasion and other historical sites, superb inland and coastal scenery, remote beaches and a working woollen mill

              Grade: Active Trail Grading Statement

              Distance

              18miles (29 km)

              Time 4 hours allowing for hills plus additional time for stops
              Start/Finish Harbour Village Car Park, Goodwick.(Grid Ref SM947388, Sat Nav SA64 0DU) Proceed up the hill past the railway station, turn left at the Rose & Crown Inn then right up New Hill. At the top of the hill turn left and the car park is on the right.
              Nearest Station Fishguard & Goodwick  1/2 mile (at bottom of Goodwick hill)
              Terrain Mainly quiet lanes. One short section liable to get muddy in wet weather.  A couple of sharp climbs but mostly a gently sloping trail.
              Elevation

              Total climb (sum of all uphill sections)  -  467 metres

              Refreshments Tregwynt Woollen Mill and Goodwick
              Toilets Tregwynt Woollen Mill and Goodwick Beach

               

              Trail Directions (distances in miles)

              0.0       Start. The Trail starts opposite Harbour Village car park entrance.

              0.7       Merge with estate road alongside playing field

              0.8       Turn right at ‘T’ junction

              1.4       Turn left towards St Nicholas

              4.4       Straight on at crossroads. (Turn right for optional very short detour to St Nicholas)

              4.9       Turn right and on past Tregwynt Woollen Mill

              5.3       Turn left at ‘T’ junction then right towards Abermawr (Tregwynt Mansion is further up the hill on the right)

              5.8       Abermawr. Turn around (optional walk down to beach)

              6.5       Turn left at ‘main’ road and continue uphill past the junction to the mill

              8.3       Turn left following sign for Pwllderi and Youth Hostel

              9.1       Pwllderi. Turn around (optional walks on nearby sections of coast path)

              9.7       Turn left at stone cottage, left again at next cottage, and left again following sign to Strumble Head. The next section is the steepest of the uphill legs of the Trail but is soon followed by a welcome downhill section. Just before the highest point is an access on the left to the path up to Garn Fawr Iron Age hill fort (a short walk up from the car park adjacent to the road)

              11.4     Turn left for Strumble Head

              12.6     Strumble Head. Turn around (optional short walk to bird observatory)

              14.9     Turn left along unsurfaced track signed ‘Unsuitable for Motors’. Note - this can be muddy in wet weather

              15.7     Turn right at Llanwnda and follow signs back to Goodwick

              16.8     Turn left before the 20 mph zone signs to follow path back to the start of the Trail (or carry straight on for a more direct route down to Goodwick and the sea front)

              An interesting alternative route for mountain bike users (shown dotted on plan) is available near the start and finish of the Trail

               

              Points of Interest along the Way
              1.  Goodwick Beach. Location of French surrender

              2.  Parc y Ffrancwr (Frenchman’s Field).  Site of fatal skirmish with French troops

              3.  St Nicholas. Picturesque village with church site dating back to Roman times

              4. Tregwynt Woollen Mill. Shop, cafe and viewing of weaving process. The working mill is open 9.00am to 4.40pm on weekdays, the shop/cafe is also open weekends

              5.  Tregwynt Mansion. A dinner dance was being attended by Colonel Knox, commanding officer of Fishguard Fencibles, when news of the invasion arrived. Knox left immediately for Fishguard Fort and the other guests fled to safety

              6.  Fishguard Fort. French fleet forced westwards by canon fire from fort

              7.  Abermawr. At very low tides the remains of a submerged forest can be seen, drowned by a sudden flood as the ice sheet melted 8000 years ago. Abermawr and Aberbach (immediately north) have long been associated with smuggling. Abermawr was the terminus for the submarine telegraph cable from Britain to America and was also considered for the terminus of Brunel’s railway link between Britain and Ireland.

              8.  Pwllderi. Idyllic cliff top setting offering superb coastline views down to St Davids

              9.  Garn Fawr Iron Age Hill Fort. Outstanding 360o views with Strumble Head to the north and the coastline to its right where the French forces landed in 1797. Snowdonia and the Wicklow Mountains in Ireland are visible on clear days

              10. Caerlem. Mary Williams, fleeing from her house, was shot in the leg by the French and ‘otherwise ill-treated’. She was awarded an annual pension of £40 and collected it for the next 56 years

              11. Strumble Head. Famous for its lighthouse, wildlife (best seen from the bird observatory) and for its magnificent views

              12. Trehowel. Home of John Mortimer who was about to get married at the time of the invasion. The wedding provisions were quickly devoured by French soldiers and Trehowel became the temporary headquarters for the invading force.

              13. Carreg Wastad. Location where the invaders came ashore. A memorial, erected in 1897, overlooks the cove. Footpath access available from Trehowel and Llanwnda

              14.  Llanwnda. Site of Neolithic burial chamber and holy well. The hamlet also has a beautiful Celtic style double bellcote church with early Christian inscribed stones and medieval roof beams with carvings. The French soldiers looted the church and actually tried to burn it down.

                 

               

              ID: 3705, revised 06/08/2018
              |Name like '%Meeting of the Waters%'|Route like '%Meeting of the Waters%'

              Meeting of the Waters Trail

              Overview
              Information

                The Trail skirts the borderlands of north-east Pembrokeshire. It starts near the former railway station at Cardigan and very soon winds its way into Pembrokeshire along a section of disused railway line affectionately known as the Cardi Bach. Wildlife, rivers and waterfalls abound along with ancient castles, churches and even tales of the Underworld.

                It is worth visiting Cardigan Castle if time allows at the end of the Trail – just continue on the cycleway alongside the river to a set of cycle stands near the end of the old bridge. The castle is on the other side of the bridge with the entrance just up the hill.

                 

                Fact File
                Highlights

                Rivers, wildlife, castles, historical churches and the underworld. Incorporates the shorter Cardi Bach Trail

                Grade: Moderate

                Distance

                171/2  miles (28 km)

                Time 4 hours plus additional time for stops
                Start/Finish The Old Station, Cardigan (Grid Ref SN181458, Sat Nav SA43 3AD) Approach Cardigan town from the south (B4546) and at the bottom of the hill turn right into Station Road (signed Pentood Ind. Est. on the downhill approach). Where Station Road bears right, turn left and immediately right past the old disused railway station building and platform on the left. The Trail starts at the end of this lane
                Nearest Station None within 5 miles
                Terrain Mainly quiet lanes. One steep uphill section at half way point - comfortable gradients elsewhere
                Elevation

                Total climb (sum of all uphill sections)  -  435 metres

                Refreshments Wildlife Centre, Cilgerran, Abercych and Cardigan
                Toilets Cardigan Castle, Wildlife Centre, Cilgerran Castle, Coracle Centre

                 

                Trail Directions (distances in miles)

                0.0       Start. Just beyond the Old Station, Cardigan, cycle under the bridge and on through the Teifi Marshes Wildlife Reserve on a traffic free path. Take care as there are usually many pedestrians of all ages and ability on this path

                0.7       Straight on at access to Wales Wildlife Centre on left

                2.1       Turn left at bottom of short hill (just prior to a ‘T’ junction) following cycle route sign. Follow this back road into Cilgerran. You will pass the Church on the right and Cilgerran Castle entrance on the left, both worth a visit whilst on the Trail.

                2.6       Turn left at ‘T’ junction into the main street through the village. There are cycle stands at the next side road junction for an optional walk down to the Coracle Centre and river gorge

                3.6       Turn left at the red kiosk (home to a phone box museum dedicated to local photographer and resident Tom Mathias) and left at the next junction

                4.6       Turn right just before Llechryd Bridge. The next section of the Trail runs alongside a disused canal and Manordeifi Church can soon be seen on the left. After visiting the church continue up the short hill and around the hairpin bend

                7.1       Bear left at junction following sign for Abercych. From this junction you can look down to the point where the main River Teifi is joined by the River Cych. This is the ‘Tripoint’ (or boundary) of the 3 counties of Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire and Ceredigion – “The Meeting of the Waters”. 50 yards before the junction is a path leading down to a footbridge for another view of the Tripoint. After bearing left you will cycle through the small village of Abercych

                8.0       Turn left at the main road and then right (with care) at the bottom of a short steep descent towards Cwmcych (Cych Valley)

                9.1       After a small bridge turn right uphill out of the valley or explore more of this enchanted Cych Valley if time allows (up to 10 miles round trip) before heading back to turn at this junction. Having turned, a gentle climb with undulations eventually takes you through a double bend and to a steeper section of the route. There is a car park on the left. Pull in and secure your bike to a tree (no stands available). Walk by the metal gate on a path above a weir and a small dam. Take the track on the right side of the house following the edge of the small lake until you reach Ffynone  Waterfall. Total walk time there and back is about 30 minutes but add time for a relaxing break. After rejoining the Trail the road steepens so you will probably want to push your bike for a while through the woodland to the top of the hill

                11.1     Straight on at crossroads. After the uphill is a downhill. Be careful on the descents

                12.6     Descend to a ‘T’ junction and turn right following sign for Llechryd

                13.0     Turn left (through Pontrhydyceirt) at crossroads following sign for Cilgerran

                15.1     Turn right after cycling right through Cilgerran following a sign for Wildlife Centre. Turn right for a visit to the nearby Welsh Wildlife Centre. There are cycle stands on site. Then return, turn right at the Centre access and carry on through the Wildlife Reserve that you passed through at the start of this ride until you arrive at the end of the Trail

                 

                Points of Interest along the Way
                1.  Cardigan Castle. Dates back to C12th and location of the first Eisteddfod in Wales in 1176. Open 10am – 4pm (11am – 3pm winter). Fees apply

                2.  Teifi Marshes Wildlife Reserve. One of the best wetland reserves in Wales

                3.  Wales Wildlife Centre. Award winning Visitor Centre nestled in lush countryside along the banks of River Teifi. Includes the magnificent Glasshouse Cafe and shop. Open 10am – 5pm (10am – 4pm winter)

                4.  Cilgerran Church. Early medieval on site of C6th Celtic church. Famous for its megalithic standing stone in the churchyard on which the ancient Ogham script can still be seen. Unfortunately the church itself is sometimes locked

                5.  Cilgerran Castle. A delightful C13th ruined castle. Said to be one of the most picturesque in Wales, it was painted and sketched several times by the artist Turner. It stands in a commanding position, perched on a craggy promontory, high above the River Teifi. Open 10am – 5pm (10am – 4pm winter). Fees apply except in winter

                6.  Coracle Centre. Famous for the annual coracle race in August and access to lovely walks along the river through the Teifi Gorge

                7.  Llechryd Bridge. A C17th multi-arch stone bridge which gets wholly submerged by the river during times of high flood. Across the bridge is a round stone building containing lots of interesting information about Llechryd and its history

                8.  Manordeifi Church. C13th church with unusual box pews, two of which have their own firplaces. The church would often be cut off by the overflowing river and a coracle is kept in the west porch to assist stranded worshippers

                9.  Cych Valley. The valley has a rich history in Welsh mythology and plays an important part in the Mabinogi as the entrance to the Welsh underworld of Annwn. A short distance up the valley is the Gothic Lancych mansion, reputed to be haunted by three ghosts and without doubt one of the most attractive houses in Pembrokeshire

                10.  Ffynone waterfall. A beautiful secluded waterfall nestled deep in Ffynone woods. Great for a paddle in the icy water

                   

                ID: 3708, revised 06/08/2018
                |Name like '%Preseli Stones%'|Route like '%Preseli Stones%'

                Preseli Stones Trail

                Overview
                Information

                  The Trail runs along the southern foothills of the Preseli Mountains and offers fine views in all directions.It starts near the former railway station at Rosebush and winds its way through Maenclochog and on to Mynachlogddu and Rhos Fach Common.

                  On the Common you will see the rugged outcrops of Carn Menyn, source of the famous ‘bluestones’ which form the inner circle at Stonehenge.

                  A small selection of the myriad of stones erected by our ancestors three to five thousand years ago can be seen from this Trail. They were once believed to harbour supernatural powers but their exact purpose remains a mystery to this day.

                  Take time at the end of the Trail to explore the little village of Rosebush with its old zinc pub, railway relics and nearby slate quarries. Numerous mountain bike trails are available with direct access from the village

                   

                  Fact File
                  Highlights

                  A scenic route along the foothills of the Preseli Mountains. Prehistoric remains abound including standing stones, a stone circle and sites of ancient battles

                  Grade: Moderate Trail Grading Statement

                  Distance

                  12 miles (19 km)

                  Time 21/2  hours plus additional time for stops
                  Start/Finish The Car Park, Rosebush (Grid Ref SN075295, Sat Nav SA66 7QU) Turn off B4313 road into Rosebush village following brown sign for Tafarn Sinc. Continue on road around Tafarn Sinc keeping the pub to   your left. Take the 1st left before the red telephone kiosk. Car Park is at the bottom of a short hill
                  Nearest Station None within 5 miles
                  Terrain Mainly quiet lanes and comfortable gradients
                  Elevation

                  Total climb (sum of all uphill sections)  -  264 metres

                  Refreshments Rosebush and Maenclochog
                  Toilets

                  Maenclochog Castle Car Park

                   

                  Trail Directions (distances in miles)

                  0.0       Start. Cycle up the short hill to the ‘T’ junction, turn right and after about 40 yards go straight ahead at the Give Way junction

                  0.4       Bear left at Give Way. Take care as this next section runs along a ‘B’ Class road although traffic flows are not that high

                  1.2       Immediately after the Maenclochog 30mph signs, pull into a side road junction on the left. Cornel Bach Standing Stones are in the first field on the right down this side road. Continue on the main road into Maenclochog village

                  1.6       After a pause to explore the village, turn left next to Caffi’r Sgwar following signs for Llangolman. Once out of the village, and following a short climb and a slight right bend in the road, Galchen Fach Stone can be seen to the left in a gap between 2 fields

                  4.5       Turn left (3rd junction on left after leaving Maenclochog) following sign for Mynachlogddu and Crymych. It’s also signed as being ‘Unsuitable for Wide Vehicles’. After about half a mile there’s an uphill section alongside St Dogmaels Church. You may wish to dismount and push your bike up this hill and pay a visit to this pleasant double-aisled church on the way

                  5.7       Gors Fawr Stone Circle is accessible via a short walk from a style on the left hand side of the road adjacent to a stone mounted plaque

                  6.5       Just before entering the village of Mynachlogddu, turn left following a sign for Rosebush

                  6.8       Rhos Fach car park. Look out for Waldo’s Stone to the left of the road and the Bluestones Monument to the right of the road

                  8.3       Glynsaithmaen

                  11.3     Turn right at ‘T’ junction (cycle on the multi-user path if desired) and right again   after 300 yards following the road into Rosebush

                  11.9     Finish at the Car Park, Rosebush

                   

                  Points of Interest along the Way
                  1. Rosebush. A small village that owes its existence to the now disused slate quarries. Each quarry had its own dressing floor and tramways. A local land owner once attempted to turn the village into a Victorian spa resort and the arrival of the railway in 1876 led to a spate of developments. The land was dug out to provide lakes and ornamental gardens and the corrugated Preseli Hotel was built which has now been renamed Tafarn Sinc. Unfortunately the development proved to be a flop as the   water had no special properties, the railway failed because Brunel built a better railway to the south, and the quarries closed. Barbara Cartland’s grandfather invested the family fortune in the railway but lost it all and it was this that prompted her to start writing to help support the rest of the family. Most of the old quarries are just beyond the terrace of quarrymen’s cottages and are worth a visit to discover secluded pools and miles of tracks for walking and mountain biking.  

                  2. Cornel Bach Standing Stones. Two standing stones that possibly once formed a cromlech or burial chamber that local people apparently blew up with gunpowder in the 18th century. Historical documentation refers to a large stone, several tons in weight, so nicely poised on three upright stones that it vibrated on the slightest touch and sounded like a bell when struck. Resonance is a particular acoustic phenomenon of some Preseli rocks. They have the rare property of being ‘musical’ and can ring like a bell or gong when struck with a small hammer-stone. This gave the village its name – Maenclochog or ‘ringing stone’ in English    

                  3.  Maenclochog. A village with evidence of prehistoric occupation. Researchers have found the remains of a 13th century castle in the car park at the lower end of the main street. The village was once served by The Maenclochog Railway and a tunnel just south of the community achieved fame during the war when it was used as a testing site for Barnes Wallis’ bouncing bomb. The church on the village green contains 5th and 6th century inscribed stones dedicated to two brothers – Andagellus and Coimangus

                  4.  Galchen Fach Stone. An 8’ 6” high stone with a slightly rounded top and a 2’ square base. It stands on a cairn and is sometimes referred to as Parc-y-Tywdd Maenhir

                  5.  Gors Fawr Stone Circle. A prehistoric  ring of 16 stones (including 8 bluestones) which are thought to have been linked at one time via an avenue of stones to two outliers 150 yards away on the north east side of the circle. The 2 larger outliers are aligned with the solstice and one of them has strong magnetic qualities and is known locally as the ‘Dreaming Stone’

                  6.  Mynachlogddu. This small village (translated ‘Black Monastery’ in English) is situated on a plateau in the heart of the Preseli Mountains. Between 1839 and 1843 the villagers here sparked a rebellion opposed to the Turnpike Laws that spread across most of South and Mid Wales. The Rebecca Riots were led by a local giant of a man Thomas Rees (Twm Carnabwth) and his grave-stone stands in the village’s Bethel Chapel. Mynachlogddu is also thought to be the site of the Battle of Mynydd Carn in 1081 between forces struggling for control of 2 Welsh kingdoms

                  7.  Rhos Fach. On one side of the road is The Waldo Memorial stone commemorating Waldo Williams, one of the leading Welsh language poets of the twentieth century. He was a notable pacifist, anti-war campaigner and Welsh nationalist. On the other side of the road is the Bluestones Monument, beyond which in the distance you can see the jagged outcrops of Carn Menyn, sometimes referred to as The Dragon’s Back. This hilltop was the source of the famous ‘bluestones’ which form the inner circle at Stonehenge. Head to the hedge and fence at the edge of the common (keeping the view of Carn Menyn to your right) and you will see the Rhos Fach standing stone pair in the adjoining field

                  8.  Glynsaethmaen. The name of a farm which in English is ‘valley of the seven stones’. Finding these stones can be a bit of a treasure hunt. The most famous are Cerrig Meibion Arthur – The Stones of Arthur’s sons. Legend has it that they were erected by King Arthur at the graves of his two sons killed at this very spot during a battle with a beast like creature which had evaded capture by his warriors. The stones are just off the lane leading north to Cwm Garw but can be seen in the distance to the right of the road at a point where it drops down to a bridge near the cattle grid sign. Gate Standing Stone is slightly easier to locate – on the right 3 fields after the sharp bend just beyond Glynsaethmaen. The top of the stone is visible from the field gate but the structure can more clearly be seen if you clamber up the hedgebank a little further up the hill. It has a chisel-shaped top and some say it resembles the shape of  an owl. At the entrance to Glynsaethman is a monolith memorial to W.R.Evans, a bard, teacher and local historian born and brought up on this farm. The first of the Rebecca Riots meetings was held in a barn at this farm and their leader, Thomas Rees, lived and worked in the nearby farmstead

                  ID: 3710, revised 03/08/2018
                  |Name like '%Westfield Trail%'|Route like '%Westfield Trail%'

                  Westfield Trail

                  Overview
                  Information

                    The Trail follows the track bed of the former Great Western Railway built between 1852-6 under the direction of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the most famous of all Victorian Engineers.

                    It runs through Westfield Pill Nature Reserve, Neyland Marina and on to the car park just beyond Brunel Quay. Most of the track bed was purchased from British Rail by the former District Council in 1982 and sections were originally cleared for use by walkers and cyclists in the early 1990s.

                    It was named the Westfield Trail at that time and was improved and extended all the way up to Haverfordwest about 10 years later when the longer Brunel Trail was developed.

                     

                    Fact File
                    Highlights

                    Mostly off-road link between Johnston and Brunel Quay, Neyland – once the terminus of Brunel’s Great Western Railway. The Trail runs along a disused railway line. Sites include woodlands, the Westfield Pill Nature Reserve, a Yacht Haven, Brunel Quay and the picturesque Cleddau estuary

                    Grade: Easy     Trail Grading Statement                                       

                    Distance

                    81/2  miles (14 km)

                    Time 2 hours plus additional time for stops
                    Start/Finish Greenhall Park Car Park, Johnston (Grid Ref SM934103, Sat Nav SA62 3PT). Free car park. From the A4076 road turn at junction adjacent to pedestrian crossing (signed Rosemarket & Llangwm). After just over100 yards, cross railway bridge and take first right and first right again. Trail starts at far end of car park
                    Nearest Station Johnston  1/2  mile (turn left uphill out of station to join a cycle path,  left over railway bridge and left again. Follow sign for Neyland that leads you alongside the railway line under a bridge. This takes you past the Start of the Trail after about 400 yards)
                    Terrain Mainly on a tarmacked traffic free path with a few minor road crossings. Reasonably flat or shallow sloping all the way
                    Elevation

                    Total climb (sum of all uphill sections)  -  146 metres

                    Refreshments Cafe at Brunel Quay (with cycle stands) and Johnston
                    Toilets Brunel Quay

                     

                    Trail Directions(distances in miles)

                    0.0       Start. Turn left out of Greenhall Park Car Park, Johnston. Follow this disused railway route all the way down to Westfield Pill Nature Reserve and Neyland Marina. On route take care at 3 minor road crossings. These would originally have been level crossings and some of the crossing-keepers cottages still survive

                    3.3       Carry straight ahead on the low level path following the Trail under the high bridge. The view southwards is now dominated by the masts of Neyland Marina

                    3.5       Start of the section of Trail alongside Neyland marina. Take care as this is no longer traffic free although vehicle usage is light and the road is traffic calmed. The Trail continues past a waterfront cafe and on past a number of boat yards to the Brunel Quay car park

                    4.3       Brunel Quay car park. Turn around and follow the same route back to Johnston

                    8.6       Greenhall Park Car Park, Johnston – end of Trail

                     

                    Points of Interest along the Way
                    1.  Westfield Pill Nature Reserve. A sheltered inlet with lagoons and islands which provide a sanctuary for hundreds of different species of birds and animals including herons, otters and over 20 varieties of butterfly. The site is managed by the Wildlife Trust

                    2.  Neyland Marina. One of the largest and prettiest yacht havens in Wales

                    3.  Brunel Quay. Until the mid C19th, Neyland was a quiet fishing village. In 1856, the renowned engineer Brunel established an Irish Packet Service at what was then named ‘New Milford’, and developed a wide range of infrastructure projects including a quay and rail link to support the ferry service. Numerous information boards on the quayside detail the history of this exciting project. The ferry service ended in 1906 and the railway closed in 1964. This part of Neyland languished until its transformation under an ambitious regeneration plan drawn up in the mid 1980s. Brunel Quay has really impressive views of the Cleddau Bridge and Estuary and the area around the Quay has pieces of historic naval equipment on show together with some of Brunel’s railway lines which have been used for a section of riverside fencing. A ferry service operated to and from Pembroke Dock until it was made obsolete in 1975 when the Cleddau Bridge was opened

                    ID: 3711, revised 12/07/2018
                    |Name like '%Wizo%'|Route like '%Wizo%'

                    Wizo Trail

                    Overview
                    Information

                      The Trail meanders through part of the central area of Pembrokeshire once controlled by Wizo, the Flemish chieftain and fierce warrior who was the feudal baron of many of the large estates in the area, including those where Picton Castle now stands. He built the castle at Wiston, which he made his home, and founded the nearby church.

                      The Trail takes you to 3 castles as well as a number of other interesting buildings of antiquity. You are also able to visit extensive gardens, some pretty waterside locations and even a local craft ale brewery

                       

                      Fact File
                      Highlights

                      A longish trail dedicated to Wizo the Fleming. The ride may take you most of the day if you stop to explore some of the many points of interest along the way. Magnificent sites you will see include castles, churches, gardens, pretty villages and the foreshore of the Eastern Cleddau River. A packed lunch and a drink is recommended

                      Grade: Active Trail Grading Statement

                      Distance

                      26  miles (42km)

                      Time 5  hours plus additional time for stops
                      Start/Finish County Hall, Haverfordwest (Grid Ref SM956155, Sat Nav SA61 1TP). County Hall can be seen from Salutation Square Roundabout, Haverfordwest and the entrance is signed. The car park is available (free) for users of the Trail at weekends. Other nearby car parks are available on weekdays (charges apply) and all have cycle paths (on the  road side) that connect to the start of the Trail
                      Nearest Station

                      Haverfordwest  1/4 mile (a cycle path leads to the start of the Trail)

                      Terrain The first 21/2 miles is mostly on a traffic free path. Apart from a short  section of bridleway at Llawhaden, the remainder of the Trail (apart from the very end) is on quiet rural lanes. Some main road crossings  are necessary which will require care, particularly if you have younger or less confident riders in your group. One of the crossings is on a section of the A40 where the national 60 mph speed limit applies. Advice on the safest way of crossing at this point is given in the Trail Directions. Gradients are generally shallow with some local undulations. There are uphill sections on the approach to Wiston and  another on the approach to Plain Dealings. Neither of these should provide a problem to anyone used to cycling. The bridleway at Llawhaden has an uneven surface and is very steep so a dismount and push is recommended for all but the super fit riding mountain bikes
                      Elevation

                      Total climb (sum of all uphill sections) - 520 metres

                      Refreshments

                      Haverfordwest and Picton Castle

                      Toilets Haverfordwest Bus Station (end of multi-storey car park) and Picton Castle (when open)

                       

                      Trail Directions(distances in miles)

                      0.0              Start. Turn left out of County Hall following the cycle path. Cross on the traffic lights to the path fronting the County Hotel. Cross the next junction and continue over a number of other crossings following the red surfaced path. Once through two short subways (ignore the right turn in the first) turn right and climb the ramp adjacent to the road. Follow the path to the top of the hill and cross the access into the retail park. Cross the road at the traffic lights just before the hospital entrance then continue on the path. Bear right just beyond the entrance into the Springfield Retail Park (opposite) and continue straight on where the path joins a minor road. Shortly after you rejoin a cycle path leading immediately to a road crossing. Cross this road with great care and continue on the cycle path (bearing right at the roundabout) until you get to another road crossing opposite a car sales centre. After crossing, turn right and follow the path for about 1/2 mile

                      1.9       Turn right into a lane signed No Through Road ‘Except for Cycles’ and continue on this lane through 2 sets of bollards which prevent access for motorised vehicles

                      2.5       At the ‘T’ junction with the B4329 road turn left. Take first right (after about 1/mile) into Cross Lane, then right again at the next ‘T’ junction, then first left into Dingle Lane after about 150 yards

                      3.4       Cross the railway level crossing and continue on the lane for about 3 miles until you get to the village of Wiston. This lane is generally uphill. Gradients are not too severe and there are distant countryside views on both sides of the road

                      6.6       Pull in to the parking area alongside the red telephone kiosk at Wiston. Cycle stands are available for you to walk to the church alongside the stands and the castle opposite. Both are worth a visit, then afterwards carry on along the lane and turn left at the ‘T’ junction. Cycle up past a pretty little pond on the left and turn right at   the first junction a little further up the hill. Continue on this road on this mainly downhill road for nearly 2 miles enjoying distant views of the Preseli Mountains to the left

                      8.9       Turn right at ‘T’ junction following sign for Llawhaden, then after a mainly uphill mile you arrive at the tiny unsigned hamlet of Plain Dealings where you need to turn left at the ‘T’ junction. However if time allows, a quick visit may be made to the Caffle Craft Ale Brewery at the old school which is about 200 yards to the right from the junction. Contact the brewery beforehand if you’re interested in paying a visit or taking a guided tour (www.cafflebrewery.co.uk for contact details). Having turned left at the above junction, take the first right (after nearly a mile) by Sycamore Ranch

                      12.0     After a steep downhill section you arrive at a farm fishery and resort on your left. This is well worth a visit with its very attractive landscaped lakes

                      12.3     Llawhaden Church is on the left. Just beyond the church it is worth briefly crossing the old hump-backed bridge which spans the Eastern Cleddau. You will be rewarded with a fine view of the river and the triple arched bridge itself which was built in the mid 18th century. Cross back over and follow the road up the hill for about 150 yards. Then turn off onto a bridleway track on the right signed ‘No motor vehicles’. If you haven’t started pushing your bike already, now is the time to do so. The track is quite steep but short and leads you directly up to Llawhaden village centre. Turn right at the top following a sign for the castle. If the bridleway is very wet it could be slippery and you may prefer to continue up the tarmacked road and turn right for Llawhaden at the next junction. Again, follow the castle sign once you arrive at the village

                      12.8     Arrive at Llawhaden Castle. After a visit, turn around and head back to the village centre. Bear right at the junction and carry on up the hill through the rest of the village. At the first junction go straight ahead. This will take you past the remains of a medieval hospice on the left which is also worth a brief visit. On a clear day the views to the south are quite superb. Just beyond the hospice site, bear left onto a minor road signed Wiston. Follow this road for just over 2 miles ignoring all side turns

                      15.0     Turn right at the point where the main road takes a sharp left turn up a hill. Follow the lane for 3 miles, again ignoring all side turns

                      18.4     At the junction with the main A40 road, the Trail turns left and then right onto a minor road about 50 yards away. The A40 is very busy and cycling on it is not recommended unless you are very experienced. It is suggested that you dismount and push your bike along the nearside verge to a point opposite the other junction. Then cross with extreme care when an opportunity arises. Be sure to look in both directions and bear in mind that A40 traffic can be moving quite quickly. Carry on cycling when you’re on the minor road opposite, following signs for The Rhos

                      19.9     In the small village of The Rhos, turn right just before the red telephone kiosk following the sign for Picton Castle

                      20.4     Entrance to Picton Castle and Gardens. After an optional visit, carry on along the lane as before

                      21.2     Arrive at Picton Ferry on the northern shore of the Eastern Cleddau River near the confluence of the Eastern and Western Cleddau. Until the Inter-War years, this was the location of a ferry to Landshipping and was the old route from Haverfordwest towards Pembroke. After a brief rest, cycle back up the lane and turn left after 200 yards. You will soon pass Rose Castle Tower on the right, one of the most mysterious buildings in Pembrokeshire. Nobody seems to know whether it’s the relic of an old church, a medieval tower house, a light tower or even a Victorian folly.

                      22.8     Turn left along a lane signed Single Track Road

                      24.2     Turn left at crossroads following sign for Haverfordwest

                      25.2     At ‘T’ junction turn right following sign for Haverfordwest. Take care as this road is a bit busier than the ones you’ve been on although it’s within a 30 mph speed limit

                      25.9     At the bottom of the hill turn left onto a very short section of cycle path immediately beyond a side road junction. Then cross the dual carriageway with care and turn left on the cycle path

                      26.0     Finish at County Hall, Haverfordwest

                       

                      Points of Interest along the Way
                      1.  Wiston. The motte-and-bailey castle in the village was built sometime in the first half of the 12th century by the early Flemish settler called Wizo. It was built on the site of an existing Iron Age earthworks. It ranks as one of the best preserved castles of this type in Wales. (Open daily 10am to 4pm, free admission). The nearby Wiston Church is also of Norman origin and contains a number of defensive features associated with this time. The settlement of Wiston obtained its name from Wizo the Fleming

                      2.  Llawhaden Church. The church is dedicated to a 6th century Irish monk, Aiden, who was a pupil of St David. It unusually has two towers, a 13th century 2 storey tower and a 14th century 3 storey tower standing next to it. The church has an interesting historical past and is positioned in a peaceful, picturesque location on the side of the river. It is the parish church of Llawhaden, one of the oldest villages in Pembrokeshire. The village lies on the Landsker Line and on one of the pilgrim routes to St Davids

                      3.  Llawhaden Castle. A fortified Bishops Palace rather than a castle, but impressively located on high ground overlooking the Eastern Cleddau valley. It was originally built in the 12th century and is very castle like in appearance. The majestic ruins are a delight to explore. (Open daily 10am to 4pm, free admission)

                      4.  Llawhaden Hospice. This 13th century ruin is situated adjacent to the Village Hall. It was one of a number of stopping places for pilgrims on route to the shrine at St Davids. Their journeys were difficult and dangerous and often took several months. Hospices offered respite, shelter and medicine whether pilgrims were rich, poor, sick or well. The ruin which still stands is a tall, rectangular structure with a barrel-  vaulted roof. A recess inside suggests that it may also have been used as a chapel associated with other hospice buildings on the same site which have long since gone

                      5.  Picton Castle. The estate at Picton was given by Wizo to one of his Flemish knights and it was at this time that the first castle was built on the site. The existing stone castle was     completed in the 13th century and transformed into a stately home in the 18th century. It is now set in 40 acres of magnificent woodland and walled gardens. It also has the largest collection of owls in Wales, a maze and a children’s adventure playground. The castle is open throughout the year (generally from 9am to 5pm) with escorted castle tours at fixed times throughout the day (entrance fees apply). Refreshments and toilets are available on site. It is possible to spend several hours exploring the castle and gardens and Trail users may prefer to save their visit for another day when more time is available to explore the attraction

                                    

                      ID: 3712, revised 13/07/2018
                      |Name like '%medieval%'|Route like '%medieval%'

                      Medieval Mystery Trail

                      Overview
                      Information

                        The Trail has many points of interest and passes alongside a number of historical sites including the medieval Lamphey Palace and Manorbier Castle. It offers superb coastal and inland views and easy access on foot to local beaches.

                        As you cycle along you will be rewarded with a variety of birdlife and their singing fills the air in spring and early summer. If time allows at the end of the tour it is worth visiting the picturesque shell-shaped cove of Manorbier Bay and the Neolithic dolmen known as King’s Quoit perched upon the headland overlooking the bay.

                        Also worth a visit on foot is the old church accessed via a gravelled walkway from the car park and the Dovecote via a path from the road just below the car park entrance. Cafes, restaurants, shops and pubs are available in villages along the route for welcome refreshmentsts.

                         

                        Fact File
                        Highlights

                        Medieval and other prehistoric sites, beaches and superb inland and coastal scenery

                        Trail Grading Statement

                        Grade Moderate
                        Distance 14 miles (23 kms)
                         Time  3.0 hours plus additional time for stops
                        Terrain Mainly quiet lanes with 2 short sections on the busier A4139 road. Quite a steep climb at the start and also on The Ridgeway
                        Elevation Total climb (sum of all uphill sections) - 324 metres
                        Start/Finish

                        Manorbier Beach Car Park (Grid Ref SS063977, Sat Nav SA70 7SY). Car Park is signed from centre of village. Toilets and cycle stands on site.

                        Seasonal  charges.  

                        Nearest Rail Station Manorbier 11/4 miles
                        Alternative Start Lamphey Bishop's Palace (Grid Ref SN018010, Sat Nav SA71 5NT) (1/2 mile from Lamphey Station)
                        Refreshments Freshwater West, Lamphey and Manorbier
                        Toilets Manorbier Car Park, Lamphey Palace (when Visitor Centre is open)

                         

                        Trail Directions (distances in miles)

                        0.0       Start. Turn left out of Manorbier Beach car park and up a fairly steep hill. Worth pushing your bike on this section to admire the coastal views

                        0.8       Turn left at cross roads

                        1.8       Bear left at ‘T’ junction into main road and after a further 150 yards turn left into a minor side road signed ‘Unsuitable for Motor Vehicles’. The short section of main road is quite narrow and can   be busy in season so take great care. Dismount and push along this short section if preferred

                        2.8       Ignore the right turn signed ‘No Motor Vehicles’ and carry straight on

                        2.9       Optional stop just beyond 30 mph signs for 2 min walk to Freshwater East viewpoint

                        3.3       Turn right into Chapel Lane signed ‘No Motor Vehicles’ and bear left after 1/2 mile

                        4.4       Turn left onto main road through Lamphey. The village has a 30 mph and a 20 mph speed limit but less confident cyclists may want to dismount just beyond the filling station and use the opposite footway for a safer passage over the railway bridge to the junction just beyond the church

                        4.8       Turn right and immediately left following signs for Lamphey Palace. Lamphey Court can be seen in the distance on the left

                        5.2       Turn around at the entrance to Lamphey Court. Optional visit to the adjacent Lamphey Palace

                        5.6       Turn left onto the historical Ridgeway road and prepare for a steady uphill climb shortly after leaving the village

                        9.6       Turn right at the crossroads just beyond the junction signed for Manorbier railway station and follow this slightly bendy road downhill and on under a railway bridge

                        10.7     Straight ahead at crossroads (cross main road with care) following sign to Manorbier

                        11.2     Turn left following sign to Youth Hostel, and left again at the Military Range gates. Cycle past the Youth Hostel and on to the Skrinkle Haven Viewpoints car park with cycle stands. When ready, return to the main road and turn left into Manorbier

                        13.8     Manorbier Castle for an optional visit. The entrance is on the left just beyond (and ignoring) the side road junction down to the beach car park. The Trail continues along the road opposite the castle entrance, turning right after 50 yards and left following a sign down to the beach car park

                        14.0     Finish. Manorbier Beach Car Park

                         

                        Points of Interest along the Way

                        (1)        Freshwater East viewpoint. Overlooking this popular resort with its wide sandy beach, once a favourite haunt for smugglers. Most of the village is located on the cliff overlooking the bay

                        (2)        Lamphey Church. An interesting building which is early medieval in origin

                        (3)        Lamphey Bishop’s Palace. The ruins of a magnificent medieval retreat for the Bishops of St Davids,located in a lovely rural setting. Plenty of nooks and crannies to explore. Detailed information is available on site. An admission fee may apply at the Visitor Centre. Palace is open daily 10am to 4pm. Reputedly the ghostly ‘White Lady’ may be glimpsed after dark between the palace and the village. She is thought to have been a member of the Devereux family who once lived at the palace

                        (4)        The Ridgeway. For many centuries this was the only road in the whole area and gave access for drovers between Pembroke and Tenby. The concentration of ancient monumental sites along The Ridgeway suggests that it also has prehistoric origins

                        (5)        Skrinkle Haven viewpoints. One overlooks Skrinkle Haven and Church Doors Cove separated from each other by a tall thin limestone ridge.  Church Doors can be accessed via a 140 step staircase. The other viewpoint looks out over Caldey Island and, on a clear day, the north Devon coast. The cliff shapes carved by the sea on this section of coastline are quite spectacular

                        (6)        Manorbier Castle. Home of the C12th writer Giraldus Cambrensis. The castle is in a stunning location overlooking the beach with well preserved stairs, towers, rooms and battlements to explore. Open mid-March to November 10am to 5pm but sometimes closed for events. Fees apply

                        (7)        Manorbier Church. A C12th Norman church built on part of an earlier monastic site. A superb location with views across to the castle and out over Manorbier Bay

                        (8)        King’s Quoit Burial Chamber. Dates from around 3000BC

                        (9)        Dovecote. A recently restored and listed ancient monument built in the C13th to provide fresh meat and eggs for inhabitants of the adjacent castle

                         (10)     Manorbier Bay. A lovely place to chill out at the end of the cycle ride. Fossils can often be found in the stream bed running into the bay

                         

                        ID: 3594, revised 09/10/2018

                        Cycle Pembrokeshire

                        SEARCH: Cycle Route

                          Information


                            Explore the countryside on your doorstep with Pembrokeshire County Council's series of cycle rides from towns and locations around the county.

                            ||Details='Start'|NOT Details='Start'

                            ID: 3265, revised 07/08/2018