Meeting of the Waters Trail - Pembrokeshire County Council

Cycle Pembrokeshire

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Meeting of the Waters Trail

Overview
Information

    The Trail skirts the borderlands of north-east Pembrokeshire. It starts near the former railway station at Cardigan and very soon winds its way into Pembrokeshire along a section of disused railway line affectionately known as the Cardi Bach. Wildlife, rivers and waterfalls abound along with ancient castles, churches and even tales of the Underworld.

    It is worth visiting Cardigan Castle if time allows at the end of the Trail – just continue on the cycleway alongside the river to a set of cycle stands near the end of the old bridge. The castle is on the other side of the bridge with the entrance just up the hill.

     
    Fact File
    Highlights

    Rivers, wildlife, castles, historical churches and the underworld. Incorporates the shorter Cardi Bach Trail

    Grade: Moderate

    Distance

    171/2  miles (28 km)

    Time 4 hours plus additional time for stops
    Start/Finish The Old Station, Cardigan (Grid Ref SN181458, Sat Nav SA43 3AD) Approach Cardigan town from the south (B4546) and at the bottom of the hill turn right into Station Road (signed Pentood Ind. Est. on the downhill approach). Where Station Road bears right, turn left and immediately right past the old disused railway station building and platform on the left. The Trail starts at the end of this lane
    Nearest Station None within 5 miles
    Terrain Mainly quiet lanes. One steep uphill section at half way point - comfortable gradients elsewhere
    Elevation

    Total climb (sum of all uphill sections)  -  435 metres

    Refreshments Wildlife Centre, Cilgerran, Abercych and Cardigan
    Toilets Cardigan Castle, Wildlife Centre, Cilgerran Castle, Coracle Centre

     

    Trail Directions (distances in miles)

    0.0       Start. Just beyond the Old Station, Cardigan, cycle under the bridge and on through the Teifi Marshes Wildlife Reserve on a traffic free path. Take care as there are usually many pedestrians of all ages and ability on this path

    0.7       Straight on at access to Wales Wildlife Centre on left

    2.1       Turn left at bottom of short hill (just prior to a ‘T’ junction) following cycle route sign. Follow this back road into Cilgerran. You will pass the Church on the right and Cilgerran Castle entrance on the left, both worth a visit whilst on the Trail.

    2.6       Turn left at ‘T’ junction into the main street through the village. There are cycle stands at the next side road junction for an optional walk down to the Coracle Centre and river gorge

    3.6       Turn left at the red kiosk (home to a phone box museum dedicated to local photographer and resident Tom Mathias) and left at the next junction

    4.6       Turn right just before Llechryd Bridge. The next section of the Trail runs alongside a disused canal and Manordeifi Church can soon be seen on the left. After visiting the church continue up the short hill and around the hairpin bend

    7.1       Bear left at junction following sign for Abercych. From this junction you can look down to the point where the main River Teifi is joined by the River Cych. This is the ‘Tripoint’ (or boundary) of the 3 counties of Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire and Ceredigion – “The Meeting of the Waters”. 50 yards before the junction is a path leading down to a footbridge for another view of the Tripoint. After bearing left you will cycle through the small village of Abercych

    8.0       Turn left at the main road and then right (with care) at the bottom of a short steep descent towards Cwmcych (Cych Valley)

    9.1       After a small bridge turn right uphill out of the valley or explore more of this enchanted Cych Valley if time allows (up to 10 miles round trip) before heading back to turn at this junction. Having turned, a gentle climb with undulations eventually takes you through a double bend and to a steeper section of the route. There is a car park on the left. Pull in and secure your bike to a tree (no stands available). Walk by the metal gate on a path above a weir and a small dam. Take the track on the right side of the house following the edge of the small lake until you reach Ffynone  Waterfall. Total walk time there and back is about 30 minutes but add time for a relaxing break. After rejoining the Trail the road steepens so you will probably want to push your bike for a while through the woodland to the top of the hill

    11.1     Straight on at crossroads. After the uphill is a downhill. Be careful on the descents

    12.6     Descend to a ‘T’ junction and turn right following sign for Llechryd

    13.0     Turn left (through Pontrhydyceirt) at crossroads following sign for Cilgerran

    15.1     Turn right after cycling right through Cilgerran following a sign for Wildlife Centre. Turn right for a visit to the nearby Welsh Wildlife Centre. There are cycle stands on site. Then return, turn right at the Centre access and carry on through the Wildlife Reserve that you passed through at the start of this ride until you arrive at the end of the Trail

     

    Points of Interest along the Way
    1.  Cardigan Castle. Dates back to C12th and location of the first Eisteddfod in Wales in 1176. Open 10am – 4pm (11am – 3pm winter). Fees apply

    2.  Teifi Marshes Wildlife Reserve. One of the best wetland reserves in Wales

    3.  Wales Wildlife Centre. Award winning Visitor Centre nestled in lush countryside along the banks of River Teifi. Includes the magnificent Glasshouse Cafe and shop. Open 10am – 5pm (10am – 4pm winter)

    4.  Cilgerran Church. Early medieval on site of C6th Celtic church. Famous for its megalithic standing stone in the churchyard on which the ancient Ogham script can still be seen. Unfortunately the church itself is sometimes locked

    5.  Cilgerran Castle. A delightful C13th ruined castle. Said to be one of the most picturesque in Wales, it was painted and sketched several times by the artist Turner. It stands in a commanding position, perched on a craggy promontory, high above the River Teifi. Open 10am – 5pm (10am – 4pm winter). Fees apply except in winter

    6.  Coracle Centre. Famous for the annual coracle race in August and access to lovely walks along the river through the Teifi Gorge

    7.  Llechryd Bridge. A C17th multi-arch stone bridge which gets wholly submerged by the river during times of high flood. Across the bridge is a round stone building containing lots of interesting information about Llechryd and its history

    8.  Manordeifi Church. C13th church with unusual box pews, two of which have their own firplaces. The church would often be cut off by the overflowing river and a coracle is kept in the west porch to assist stranded worshippers

    9.  Cych Valley. The valley has a rich history in Welsh mythology and plays an important part in the Mabinogi as the entrance to the Welsh underworld of Annwn. A short distance up the valley is the Gothic Lancych mansion, reputed to be haunted by three ghosts and without doubt one of the most attractive houses in Pembrokeshire

    10.  Ffynone waterfall. A beautiful secluded waterfall nestled deep in Ffynone woods. Great for a paddle in the icy water

       

    ID: 3708, revised 06/08/2018